horticultural course

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by ajmctree, Dec 13, 2004.

  1. ajmctree

    ajmctree LawnSite Member
    Posts: 68

    I'm taking a couple of horticultural courses during the off season through a Canadian university and i am sitting here stumped on a question .

    In what situation would complete soil modification be required ?

    If any one has a clue or know where i can look to find this answer it would be appreciated.

    Thanks
    Ajmctree
     
  2. jwholden

    jwholden LawnSite Member
    from CT
    Posts: 218

    Tell me what the conditions are and I'll tell you what to modify.

    Are we talking about PH, Nutrients, organic matter, silt-sand-clay ratio?

    It's been too long since I studied this stuff, but could this be a trick question? Do they want you to say you can't modify something unless you know what is there first. Run a soil test first...

    Otherwise, you must have daydreamed during the lecture when the prof. said the one sentence of the one situation.

    My .02.
     
  3. D Felix

    D Felix LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,898

    I would agree with jwholden...

    Without knowing what's there first, it's hard to know what to modify.

    About the only thing I can come up with would possibly be for reclamation, or contaminated soil....


    Dan
     
  4. ajmctree

    ajmctree LawnSite Member
    Posts: 68

    Probably the biggest problem is i'm doing by correspondence.
    The question relates to the chapter on soils.
    Also the part that it talks about soil modification is related to hanging baskets ,football fields,indoor plants, putting greens . It doesnt say why you would do it and there really is no details about it .
    I,ve search for a couple of hours today on the internet searching for info on this to no avail.

    Ajmctree
     
  5. lewdo

    lewdo LawnSite Member
    Posts: 86

    Complete Modification would be done on a lawn that had severe problems. Examples would be, lots of weeds, not much grass, little or no 'O' horizon, ph either acidic or alkaline, etc....

    Instead of trying to remedy all of these problems it would be easier to bring in good soil, rototill in and start over.
     
  6. jwholden

    jwholden LawnSite Member
    from CT
    Posts: 218

    After thinking about this some more I realized that you already posted the answer. I would read up on putting greens. If I'm not mistaken they are a very elaborate mix of drainage, sandy soil, and god knows what else to make them work.

    Regis, that is my final answer.
     
  7. activelandscaping

    activelandscaping LawnSite Member
    Posts: 241


    Modification = (the act of making something different). Farmers do this every time they lime their fields.

    Regards,
    Active
     

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