Horticulture

Discussion in 'Turf Renovation' started by Smallaxe, Jul 10, 2012.

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  1. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,080

    Growing grass is just another horticultural crop... it thrives or struggles just like every other living thing on the planet...
    To understand horticulture it's good to understand how plants relate to their above ground environment... space, air circulation, sun/shade, etc.,etc.
    Also their below ground environment, air, tilth, CEC, texture of the soil, etc. etc...

    My goal as a horticulturalist is always to get plants to thrive... to be able to survive adversity w/out death and not be dependant on perpetual 4 week ferts or the crutches of irrigation that runs 2 or 3 times a week...

    There used to be no irrigation in any lawns and in many lawns there is still, no irrigation... I don't want to discuss the issue of the lawns turning brown, nor the conventional wisdom of what constitutes 'correct soil moisture' but a thought provoking concept of soil health... healthy soils = happy roots... :)

    Are lawns healthier and stronger when they go through periods of dry soil???
     
  2. easy-lift guy

    easy-lift guy LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,376

    Your philosophy may be well founded but simply does not apply here in Florida. The Mind set is to have a beautiful landscape 24-7 365. At least where your from your landscapes can have a Vacation and live much longer with little or no care for many years. With a year
    round growing season here life expectancy for a landscape can be measured in months and sometimes in years due to what I just described.
    At least you have a seasons, we for the most part never will.
    easy-lift guy
     
  3. Grasssales2001

    Grasssales2001 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 111

    Axe, everyone has a different business philosophy. I would say a large majority of LCO's are more interested in how much revenue they can generate ,than in growing healthy plants.

    In my area, very few LCO's have any education in horticulture.
     
  4. Duekster

    Duekster LawnSite Fanatic
    from DFW, TX
    Posts: 7,961

    Very few do including the OP.
     
  5. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,080

    You may very well be correct... The forum would be a good place to learn to excel in many ways, but now its been turned over to loudmouth bullies who drop into a thread with nothing to say except personal insults...
     
  6. Duekster

    Duekster LawnSite Fanatic
    from DFW, TX
    Posts: 7,961

    It is better than ridiculing proven practices.
     
  7. Grasssales2001

    Grasssales2001 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 111

    I agree Axe. We could all learn something from each other.
     
  8. Duekster

    Duekster LawnSite Fanatic
    from DFW, TX
    Posts: 7,961

    One way or another there is something to be learned. :rolleyes:
     
  9. Grasssales2001

    Grasssales2001 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 111



    Back to the original question.

    Axe, what do you think constitutes "healthy soil"? I've seen healthy plants grown in many different soils. I've also seen a lot of unhealthy looking plants grown in what appears to be healthy soil so..........
     
  10. kennc38

    kennc38 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 293

    Are you sure that was his original question?? He also mentioned "ground environment... space, air circulation, sun/shade, etc.,etc."; "Also their below ground environment, air, tilth, CEC, texture of the soil, etc. etc..."; "not be dependant on perpetual 4 week ferts or the crutches of irrigation that runs 2 or 3 times a week..."; "but a thought provoking concept of soil health... healthy soils = happy roots... :)"; and "Are lawns healthier and stronger when they go through periods of dry soil?".

    No offense, but as is typical with Axe, his "question" involves many topics, sub-topics, questions, and mini-questions that it's almost impossible to answer with a "simple" answer. Have fun going down whatever road he's trying to go down...
     
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