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How do I estimate this?

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by RLS24, Jun 6, 2008.

  1. RLS24

    RLS24 LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,601

    I've estimated lawns before, but I've never estimated a landscape job. Basically, I just do a few lawns aside from my "day job" and this is one of my lawn clients.

    The job will include re-edging all the beds, taking out all the pea gravel thats currently in the bed and mulching it, creating a new bed (prob 4' wide by 10' long) and creating a bed around an above ground pool. I will be planting some new shrubs, trimming some existing ones, and possible installing some landscape lighting around the pool (power is already out there so no need to run it from the house).

    So, aside from the cost of materials, what should I base my price on? I know that description is not helpful, so I will swing by there later and get a few pictures and be more descriptive of exactly what is going to be done.
  2. JNyz

    JNyz LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,086

    How long do you think it wil take you? and how much will material cost you?
  3. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,081

    Base your estimate on time. Don't bid the lighting until you see how you made out on the oriniginal bid, but keep the lighting in mind as you are restructuring the landscape. Pea gravel removal can be very tedious and time consuming, but tilling can cover a multitude of sins.
  4. JimmyStew

    JimmyStew LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 367

    I don't mean to sound rude, but, who cares. If mowing and/or landscaping is not your "profession" then you can't price a job like a professional. Make sure you cover your materials and then charge a little for your time, or give them the name of professional landscape contractors in their area.

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