How do you know?

Discussion in 'Organic Lawn Care' started by DeepGreenLawn, May 14, 2009.

  1. DeepGreenLawn

    DeepGreenLawn LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,372

    I was wondering, and have been wondering, as you get your lawns soil, or any soil for that matter, rebuilt with OM and all. How do you know when you need to add more OM to replenish the nutrients needed in the soil.

    What I am speaking of is something such as N, you can't get a reading on the N in the soil even though it is there locked up in the OM. SO... surely over time, the N will be deminished over time... maybe a LONG time, maybe there is so much there it isn't an issue...

    BUT... if it were an issue, how do you know when to make an additional treatment? To me I say just throw a light dressing of compost every so often and you don't have to worry about it.

    One other question... N can be locked up in the soil and not be able to be read... is there P and K also locked up in the soil that can't be read by your basic soil tests?
     
  2. treegal1

    treegal1 LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,911

    tissue test are a good option... but if the lawns are green and the customer has paid with a smile that works for me
     
  3. JDUtah

    JDUtah LawnSite Silver Member
    from UT
    Posts: 2,636

    You can get a test done that checks total N.. including N that is not soluble.
     
  4. DeepGreenLawn

    DeepGreenLawn LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,372

    I am seeing a lot of $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ there....
     
  5. DeepGreenLawn

    DeepGreenLawn LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,372

    sounds good to me
     
  6. JDUtah

    JDUtah LawnSite Silver Member
    from UT
    Posts: 2,636

    $6 per total N test is not a lot of dough...

    $11.50 if you are lazy and don't want to prep it. Still not bad.

    Or you could just go off a regular soil test (that is what you are doing right?) that gives you SOM %. Once you beat 5-10%... you are sitting pretty as far as compost goes.

    Just a side note... adding compost based on N requirements is not a good idea. You are likely to throw the nutrient balance off.
     
  7. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,080

    I have have my own soil test... Looks good, smells good, performs well, green grass on it... it recieves a recommendation - "No need to micromanage this bit of natural activity".
     
  8. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,308

    ............. Explain
     
  9. JDUtah

    JDUtah LawnSite Silver Member
    from UT
    Posts: 2,636

    Ratios ..................
     
  10. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,308

    That is not an explanation.
     

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