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How do you price fall cleanups when asked for a full season contract

Discussion in 'Landscape Maintenance' started by RonWin, Nov 9, 2013.

  1. RonWin

    RonWin LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 658

    Just trying to figure out the different ways there are to go about pricing in fall cleanups when a new potential customer asks for a full season contract the next year. Any advice?
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  2. Turf Commando

    Turf Commando LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,181

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    Figure the cost of mowing for the season and what you want for leaf cleanup. Add together and you solved it.
     
  3. RonWin

    RonWin LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 658

    Usually figure a minimum of 400, 3-5 weeks of sucking up leaves. Still guess work, wondering if there was a better method.
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  4. Turf Commando

    Turf Commando LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,181

    Everyone has their formula for estimating. Only you can decide the rate.!
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  5. windflower

    windflower LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,080

    Most of my jobs take about 10% longer in fall because of the leaves, mainly blowing them onto the lawn for the mower to suck up. Weekly accounts go to 10 to 14 day intervals since the grass really isn't growing. Essentially the leaves extend the mowing season till Christmas around here. I charge more per service in fall, but the frequency drops. With no trimming or edging the monthly bills are a tad higher, 5% to 15% depending on the quantity of leaves and bed space to deal with.
     
  6. echo

    echo LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,685

    Almost every property is different. You know what you charge to cut. After that you have to estimate/figure how many trees/leaves you're gonna deal with. Only you know your speed and how long it takes you to do a job barring any equipment problems. Figure that out, add it to the weekly cut, and you've got your estimate.
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