How does this sound

Discussion in 'General Industry Discussions' started by Turf Dawg, Feb 7, 2013.

  1. Turf Dawg

    Turf Dawg LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,720

    Thanks for holding back :laugh::drinkup:

    Do you have a good one in mind?
     
  2. Turf Dawg

    Turf Dawg LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,720

    Sehitchman, thank you.
    That is some of the stuff I was looking for. I am very good at the face to face things but poor at letter writing.
     
  3. TriCityLawnCareLLC

    TriCityLawnCareLLC LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Ohio
    Posts: 1,024

    Our company has experienced incredible growth the last few years and the demands of managing both residential and commercial accounts has taken us in a new direction. Starting this month I will focus my attention on the commercial mowing side of my business and expect to continue growth of my company in the commercial market. I have partnered with the following companies to take over our residential mowing customers. Rest assured that I am confident X company and Y company are very capable and will continue the exceptional service you are used to.


    We plan to continue all of the following services to both our residential and commercial customers. Weed, fertilizer, Fire Ant control along with irrigation, light landscaping, seasonal color and commercial maintenance.

    Thank you so much for your many years of patronage and we wish you and yours all the ve.
    [/COLOR]



    The highlighted changes look good
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2013
  4. cdqat1432

    cdqat1432 LawnSite Member
    Male, from Youngstown, Ohio
    Posts: 138

    It is important to remember what and who got you started. I can think of several companies in my area that went this route. First the grass, then snow. Maybe it isn't really profitable, or it is just alot of work, but they see you out there working and they think to call you for other work. The most basic marketing principle is repetition. People have very short memories. If they don't see you frequently they will call someone else. As you can imagine, those companies are now out of business.
     
  5. cdqat1432

    cdqat1432 LawnSite Member
    Male, from Youngstown, Ohio
    Posts: 138

    One thing I always did was drop the bottom ten percent. Id the worst payers, lawns that are wet no matter what, impossible to please customers, too far out of the way, whatever. Then raise the price on the rest. If you keep your best customers, your attitude will change. And don't forget, 80% of your business comes from 20% of your customers.
     
  6. Lawnzoo

    Lawnzoo LawnSite Member
    Posts: 6

    Why would a customer want the other Company to do a "Satisfactory" job ? Change the verbiage to "They will provide superior service"
     
  7. ToddH

    ToddH LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,184

    That is a good point or you may say "They will provide the same high quailty of service you expect ....."
     
  8. mitchgo

    mitchgo LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,767

    How in the world do you think that applies to the lawn care business? Please elaborate? Does 20% of the people they work for have faster growing lawns and plants?? Noo ...Clearly it's all in the company and how well they do there business . I'm not saying the formula doesn't apply elsewhere.. But not lawncare.. Of course some people are willing to put there money into it. But that mentality in the lawncare business will get you nowhere. Has it for you?

    To the op I agree with others, scrap and re-write . Make the customer feel wanted and appreciated.. not shat on because yo betta den dem!!! right?
     
  9. ToddH

    ToddH LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,184

    It more likely does apply to commerical bids. I do not think he is applying it correctly. You raise the prices on the bottom and leave the profitable ones alone.
     
  10. cdqat1432

    cdqat1432 LawnSite Member
    Male, from Youngstown, Ohio
    Posts: 138

    Posted via Mobile Device
     

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