How Good is Wright's 32 in stander ?

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by TNT LawnCare Inc., Sep 25, 2006.

  1. TNT LawnCare Inc.

    TNT LawnCare Inc. LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,157

    1ST ive read just about all the threads on this little mower. What i want to know is how much more productivity it can give. We currently use 32 in walk-behinds on those yards with the small gates. So has anyone used this mower all season long ? Your pro's and con's, Anyone mulching with it,should we get the bigger 17 H.P. engine:laugh: How is it without a dovetail trailer. Thanks to all:waving:
  2. ed2hess

    ed2hess LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,206

    Because of some of your concerns we bought the Wright Sentar Sport 36" which has the 17hp, rapid height adjustment, starter, and a seat. We also mulch everything and the unit is doing fine. We switched from 36" WB hydro units to this unit not for productivity but because we wanted to ride. Our properties are too small to use sulky.
  3. TNT LawnCare Inc.

    TNT LawnCare Inc. LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,157

    Ive heard great things about the 36 sentar sport. just about all our properties have 33 in gates, thats why i'am thinking of the 32 stander. Ive put a sulkey on the back of one of the 32 in W.B. it does pretty well. Just tired of the pistol grips,and no real reverse.

    Ed do you have any problems getting these on the trailer without the dovetail.
  4. lawns Etc

    lawns Etc LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,272

    Talk your customers into putting a 48 inch gate in place of the small one if its chain link it will cost less than $100 in parts and will only take you an hour to install I charge the cust $200 parts and labor and you will both benefit from more room the 36" stander is the way to go definately get the rapid height model 2-3 hours on it and you will never want a WB again
  5. Hermanator

    Hermanator LawnSite Member
    Posts: 223

    It can be a batch, but it helps to the have the trailer higher in the front when hooked up. Some times you will need to pop a wheelie to get it over the hump. It may scare you at first, but it's not a problem and won't tip over backwards.

    DON'T buy the 32! The weight and narrow tire are a huge mismatch in my opinion. We have had serious rutting issues on regular lawns. Not with the turning part, thats easy, but just the regular back and fourth on the lawns. It will rut, no matter what any one says. We have run it for 3 months now and it does rut.

    We have the 17 horse and mulch almost 100%. 15 horse would probably be ok if it was electric start.
  6. TPLawnPro

    TPLawnPro LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 424

    The Wright Stander 32 is a fantastic mower. I can't imagine this machine with a 17 hp Kawasaki. The only reason that I would go with the 17 hp Kawasaki would be for the electric start. The 15 hp Kaw has plenty of power. The grass grows fast and gets very thick down here in the south. So if a 15 hp Kaw on this machine can handle our southern turf with ease, just think of how effortless it will get the job done up north where you are.

    The only thing that I would change in the design of this mower, is to put wider tires on it. The twin-hydro pumps deliver tremendous torque; consequently, the machine leaves its share of ruts. I am just hoping that over time, as the machine breaks in, that the hydros will decrease in sensitivity a little.

    I am going to purchase the Wright Stander 36 w/ Rapid-Hite next week. If you require on-demand precise maneuverability, and are in need of a walk-behind type mower, then the Wright Stander is for you. They're a little expensive, but I now feel that they are well worth it. Not to knock the Exmark Turf Tracer, but I was never as productive with it as I am with this Wright mower. In contrast to my Exmark Turf Tracer 36, the Wright Stander is just a totally different monster all together.
  7. ed2hess

    ed2hess LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,206

    No we have an enclosed trailer but you can raise the deck up pretty high on the 36" with the rapid height lever. The The 17hp is on the 36" and it is a beast. I see the guys simply pop a wheelie to get on trailers on the 32" fixed deck. Same guys do the same to get up curbs, not my idea of a very good solution. To get our Walker on dovetail we bought the curb hopper device for $100 and we put it under the edge of the ramp to get about 3" of height and it helps. We also use the Walker ramp to get Sentar up curbs.
  8. GLC51

    GLC51 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 128

    I really like my 32" Stander. I got it because a lot of my properties are small and in town here a lot have those dinky little gates. I love how manouverable it is. It's a blast to ride. Iv'e had a number of people say that it looks like a lot of fun to use. I would have gottne the 36" if I didn't have these stupid gates. Not being able to get through them means using the 21", no thank you. Yes I wish the tires were wider but your limited when you are making it narrow. As for the rutting it depends on the soil and moisture conditions. My 44" Toro walk behind would rut too. Productivity wise they are very productive. My 32" cuts faster than my 44" hydro 20hp Toro with a sulky did by a fair bit. Demo one for a bit. If you do take note of what holes the control rods are in. I think they come in the high response postion (mine did). Makes it waaay too twitchy. Put it in the less resposive position, still very responsive but way less jumpy. as far as the rutting goes I've found a big difference based on rear tire pressure. The manual says 8 - 12 lbs. I run mine a 8.5, less rutting and a much softer ride. I also made a spring platform too, that helps also. Mine has the 15hp Kawi easy to start and enough power although in the tall wet stuff you have to slow down. Great machine.

    CWRSNY LawnSite Member
    Posts: 39

    Now what does everyone mean by rutting?? The tires rip up the grass or the weight of the machine causes valleys in the turf?

    Thanks Mike
  10. metro36

    metro36 LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,412

    The tires cause valleys in the turf. That is what we call a rut.

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