How keep live oaks from sprouting up in lawn?

Discussion in 'General Industry Discussions' started by daysel, Jun 15, 2008.

  1. daysel

    daysel LawnSite Member
    from TEXAS
    Posts: 140

    What would be the best way to handle this?
     
  2. PHS

    PHS LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 724

    Pre-em's don't work from what I've seen but they die after being cut a few times anyway. If you're licensed you could do a post-em treatment if they're really a problem.
     
  3. mngrassguy

    mngrassguy LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,167

    Yup, cut the lawn. They will die.
     
  4. txgrassguy

    txgrassguy LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,083

    The short answer is " you can't" permanently.
    These sprouts are emerging from the roots, roots that have been scarified so the root is sending up new advantageous growth.
    Digging them up and applying a petroleum based sealant won't help either.
    And what ever you do, do not use a rototiller or sod cutter to cut the new growth out - you will only magnify the problem.
    What you CAN do, if you are licensed in Texas for pesticide applications is to use glyosphate of 41% at 1.5 to 2 ozs per gallon plus 2,4-D at 1 oz per gallon and chemically mow the new growth. Expect about a month and a half of control before new growth emerges.
    And no, at the weaker rate, you won't harm the tree.
    Mowing the lawn will not kill this growth at all, in fact the more cultural pressure you apply, the worse the growth will become.
     
  5. daysel

    daysel LawnSite Member
    from TEXAS
    Posts: 140

    It is mainly just around the trunk. Maybe a flowerbed or something to cover it up.
    Thanks.
     
  6. txgrassguy

    txgrassguy LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,083

    You still have to address the problem as covering it up won't slow or diminish the new growth.
     
  7. daysel

    daysel LawnSite Member
    from TEXAS
    Posts: 140

    No, but it is harder to grow through a weed barrier and mulch. Plus, you don't have to worry about killing grass when you spray if you decide to. Either way, it seems like it would help.
     
  8. PHS

    PHS LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 724

    That's the only possibility? No chance it could be acorn sprouts?
     
  9. txgrassguy

    txgrassguy LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,083

    daysel, you asked a question, I answered.
    You need to remember that mulch and a weed barrier will not stop the problem nor significantly control it.
    At the rates mentioned, the spray solution is not toxic to turfgrass unless it is St Augustine. You didn't mention the type of turfgrass.
    PHS, the odds of the new growth being acorn sprouts are pretty low to almost non-existent.
    The live oak acorns are covered in a coating which requires removal or significant scarification (similar to what happens in the digestive track of cattle) in order to imbibe water to grow. Same with the ubiquitous Cedar and Mesquite trees.
     
  10. daysel

    daysel LawnSite Member
    from TEXAS
    Posts: 140

    So you don't think they will have a more difficult time emerging through a weed barrier and being shaded out by the mulch? Your solution was to spray them right? Do you think the mulch can tolerate glyphosate better than a lawn?
     

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