How late can I plant arborvitae?

Discussion in 'Landscape Maintenance' started by dmk395, Dec 26, 2011.

  1. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,080

    Yes those long term environmental conditions are relevant over time. If you do not have good drainage, then drainage needs to be provided.

    What I was referencing is the newly planted/transplanted arborvitaes... for the first 2 or 3 days they should be flooded as much as possible to settle them in, and once the excess water has drained off they are good to go... true of everything I plant, not just arbs... :)
     
  2. MarkintheGarden

    MarkintheGarden LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,072

    That is true, everything gets soaked for a couple days, but two weeks of wet roots can cause diseases or just plain drown some plants, meanwhile some can live with wet roots.
     
  3. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,080

    Exactly... The rootzone should be drained and moist before the ground freezes, esp. in heavy soils... :)

    My old story about the irrigation guy claiming that the hillside was set by him correctly and the fact that I bumped the amount of irrigation for that zone, had drown the newly planted shrubs that were placed by his crew...

    I dug up the dead plants and found that the rootball was bone dry because it was never soaked in at planting time... still wrapped in burlap the ground around it had aqdequate moisture, but inside the burlap water was not getting through...
     
  4. chips17

    chips17 LawnSite Member
    from PA
    Posts: 81

    listen to bobcat. since hes an expert....
     
  5. JNyz

    JNyz LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,084

    Yes, the bobcat post doesn't make much sense.
     
  6. chips17

    chips17 LawnSite Member
    from PA
    Posts: 81

    I'm surprised he didn't say "looks good" for a while there i thought that was his auto-signature
     

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