how long to wait after 3-way Ester

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by ricsin1, Feb 8, 2012.

  1. ricsin1

    ricsin1 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 81

    I have a fescue lawn and I want to sod with bermuda. My lawn company just applied 3-way ester weed control today ( 2/8/2012 ) . How long do I have to be able to sod with bermuda? my plans are to kill off the fescue first with "round up" , then till, then sod with bermuda.. being that they just applied the 3-way ester today how long should I wait? does 3-way ester even prevent new sod from rooting? or is that just SEED?
     
  2. lawnrx

    lawnrx LawnSite Member
    from ga
    Posts: 137

    Three way will not stop the sod from growing. The sod will start rooting in when the ground temp get to around 58 or warmer. spray your round-up and kill the fescue now and put out the sod two days later.
     
  3. DA Quality Lawn & YS

    DA Quality Lawn & YS LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 8,866

    Too bad your LCO just wasted an app on grass that you don't intend to keep.
     
  4. greendoctor

    greendoctor LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 8,941

    Most broadleaf herbicides applied at label rates do not affect bermuda sod, plugs or sprigs installed after application. My typical burndown application when converting areas from wild vegetation to lawn includes RoundUp + triclopyr and/or 2,4-D along with something for nutsedge if that weed is present. Existing vegetation dies within a week to 10 days after which the old vegetation is grubbed out/tilled and the new lawn is planted. I am sure the lawn could not be replanted so soon if seed were involved. However, the majority of fine turf in my state is not from seed.
     
  5. ricsin1

    ricsin1 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 81

    what about if I wanted to SEED bermuda instead of sod....? how long does it take for the 3-way ester to not interfer with seed germination....i may plan on seed in APRIL...
     
  6. greendoctor

    greendoctor LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 8,941

    If you are seeding, it normally takes at least two weeks for the ester not to interfere. What kind of seed are you planning to use? Right now I have a failed Tifgreen bermuda lawn at home to deal with. The replacement grass will be an improved bermuda seed blend. Trying out some La Prima XD. That is supposed to be finer bladed and more disease resistant than common bermuda. Not that I have to worry about cold, but it is also pretty cold hardy as well. I hope to have the appearance of fine bermuda without the issues of trying to maintain something that belongs on a golf green and no where else.
     
  7. ricsin1

    ricsin1 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 81

    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  8. ricsin1

    ricsin1 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 81

    I only have 3000sq feet to seed. Im gonna slurge on 5lb Princesses 77 ($130) +a 4lb bag of Riviera ($80). My plan is to make my own blend of the two seeds. Both got great reviews..that $210 on seed is much better than the $800 in sod i would need... LaPrima Xd got good reviews too..

    Why did your Tifway fail?
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  9. greendoctor

    greendoctor LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 8,941

    Not Tifway, Tifgreen. Big difference. Tifgreen is even finer and more delicate. I lost mine due to extreme bad weather. No sun for months, rain and wind. Normally this lawn is maintained by constant fungicide and insecticide treatment. If it is windy for 12 months straight, can't spray.

    Princess and Riviera are two top rated varieties of bermuda. You are getting away fairly inexpensively. I know I am. Enough La Prima XD to seed 2,000 sq ft was under $100. Sod in my area is way more than that. Try more like $3 per sq ft if I used Tifway or Celebration.
     
  10. RigglePLC

    RigglePLC LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,911

    Ricsin,
    It is 12 degrees where I live. However, I think you would be best to kill and then remove the old sod with a sod cutter, and dispose of the residue rolls. Perhaps no need to kill it first. Rotary tilling just makes a mess--you get hundreds of clumps of old sod. You need to rake them out.
    Secondly, you must wait until weather and soil are warm to seed Bermuda. I suggest waiting until the daytime temperatures hit about 90. Soil temp of about 80. HOWEVER, local members here can advise you best.

    I am not sure if kill, followed by slit seeding would reduce the labor by 50 percent. Local advice in Atlanta needed again.
     

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