How much rain before you stop??

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by LwnmwrMan22, May 1, 2008.

  1. LwnmwrMan22

    LwnmwrMan22 LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,372

    We're finally getting temps warm enough to get into spreading the pre-emergent.

    Dimension 2EW calls for 1/2" of water to water in.

    Tomorrow they're calling for an all day rain, 1/2-3/4" of rain. My buddy won't go spread.

    I'm going to go spread.

    Would you spread in the rain with material that needs to be watered in?
     
  2. kbrashears

    kbrashears LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 761

    Absolutely not.
     
  3. tremor

    tremor LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,476

    Absolutely spread. Lawn Care folks who are afraid of the rain are in the wrong business.

    That half inch is the required minimum to set a decent barrier. Within reason, larger rain events are not a problem despite what some homeowners might think. YOU are the trained & licensed professional so YOU decide.

    Of course you need to keep the hopper & impeller dry. Hopper covers & a roll of paper towels is NOT an option in the spring. If the rainfall is so heavy that moisture starts to affect your spread then a break is called for. Coffee shops, delis, etc are perfect places to catch up on voice mail while waiting for showers to pass. If the hopper gets too fouled then it's time to call it a day.
     
  4. kbrashears

    kbrashears LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 761

    If you are pushing, and it's not raining, spread.

    If you are riding and it's rained a lot, absolutely not.

    If you are riding, and it's just started raining, coffee time.
     
  5. greendoctor

    greendoctor LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 9,059

    I spray all of my applications. If I am doing one that I would otherwise be watering in, yes I go out in the rain and do it. The only time I do not is if a flash flood is forecast or if it is highly likely that it will rain enough that the water will not infiltrate down and instead cause runoff from the treated area. Dimension is one that I would spray in a nonflooding rain, especially if the lawn is not on an irrigation system. That product is wasted if it is not watered in well soon after application. Besides, where I am at, it can be over 90 every day if it is not raining. It is better for my health to stay cool and wet.
     
  6. LwnmwrMan22

    LwnmwrMan22 LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,372

    K-

    Why are you so dead set about spreading in the rain?

    I will admit that a couple of years ago, I sprayed a small park right after a fairly heavy shower past. It was late summer, and the grass was dried off, but the ground below was still wet.

    You could see where the ride-on's tires were, because I had lines of dandelions that were still there.

    Turns out the spray landed on the leaves, but then when I drove over the plant, it more or less washed off the spray from the moisture on the ground.

    Again, this is a broadleaf herbicide though, where you do not want it to get wet for +/- whatever hours your product calls for.
     
  7. kbrashears

    kbrashears LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 761

    Spreading=granular=wet, gunked up mess with poor distribution.
     
  8. LwnmwrMan22

    LwnmwrMan22 LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,372

    Yes, that's fairly obvious.

    I personally run an enclosed trailer with the material and spreader inside.

    If it's a downpour obviously it can't be done, but an all day slow rain, I personally don't see issues when you're doing product that needs the "instant" watering.
     
  9. Stillwater

    Stillwater LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,830

    what product cannot wait 24 hrs.? what requires "instant" watering in?
     
  10. LwnmwrMan22

    LwnmwrMan22 LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,372

    I didn't literally mean "instant", that's why it's in quotes.

    I meant product that needs water, unlike a broadleaf or non-selective, where you do not want water.

    I'll change that to "why not, when the product requires 1/2" of water to properly be effective".
     

Share This Page