How much seed to use for overseeding??

Discussion in 'Homeowner Assistance Forum' started by Jeffd1979, Sep 19, 2004.

  1. Jeffd1979

    Jeffd1979 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 56

    This is my lawns 2nd fall season and this summer put a hurtin on my lawn.. lost about 30% of the grass in my yard and have alot of patches.. last week after hurrincane francis came through i threw 120lbs of lime down and areated real good.. this week after Ivans rain came through i spreaded 25lbs of seed down and areated again really good with my pull behind core areator. How much more seed should i put down? i have another 25lb bag.. do i need more then that? what do you guys think? i have about 5000 sq feet of grass.

    Thanks in advance
     
  2. work_it

    work_it LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 976

    If you're only overseeding you shouldn't need more than 5 lbs./1000 sq ft.
    For the bare areas I would use around 7-9#/1000 sq ft.

    Keep in mind that putting down too much seed can be worse than not putting down enough.
     
  3. Jeffd1979

    Jeffd1979 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 56

    Why is that? what happens when you put down to much seed? also on the bag it says to put 1/4 inch of pete moss over the seed.. how an i supposed to do that over the whole yard? I just overseeded and areated.. will that be enough?
     
  4. work_it

    work_it LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 976

    Putting down too much seed is like planting flowers or trees too close together. If you have too many plants competeing for the same water and nutrients it will cause all of them to become underdeveloped and weak. It's important for the roots to be able to have enough room to grow. You should be fine without the pete moss since you already used lime and aerated, but I'm not really sure what your soil conditions and nutrient levels are. If you were applying lime I would have to assume that you had high acid levels in the soil and needed to nutralize it. Right? Other than that you just need to make sure you use proper watering techniques. Once the grass reaches 3" you can then add your fertilizer, but not until then. Just make sure you don't over do it with the nitrogen. It's really easy to burn the roots if the levels get too high. Just remember that with the fertilizer it's sometimes better to apply it at half rates, and much easier to monitor the progress of the new grass that way.
     
  5. Jeffd1979

    Jeffd1979 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 56

    My soil conditions are horrible. When we built the house they had to level the lot some so they took about 4 feet of soil off the top.. what i have not is a clay and soil mix.. The neighbor above me said i should put down a small amount of rye he says when that dies off int he spring the roots help condition the soil.
     
  6. work_it

    work_it LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 976

    Sure, the decaying organic material will help keep the soil loose and will add nutrients, but the main reason for people to use the rye is to detour soil erosion and weeds from germinating. Problem is it just won't be enough organic material. Sounds like the pete moss, aged manuer, and sand may need to be worked into the soil to aid in fixing the chemical balance and drainage. Just be careful with the amount of sand you add. Adding sand and clay together is a good way to make concrete.
     

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