How much weight can I put in my F250?

Discussion in 'Trucks and Trailers' started by Lynden-Jeff, Nov 15, 2007.

  1. Lynden-Jeff

    Lynden-Jeff LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,405

    Hey,

    I have an 04 6L F250 with an added heavy duty leaf in the back. The guy at the spring ship said 2100 lbs no problem. I need to pick up a skid that weighs around 2700. Will this bottom out the back end or damage anything? Is it possibly for a short trip?

    Thanks
    Jeff
     
  2. CLARK LAWN

    CLARK LAWN LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,526

    ive had almost that much in my 1/2 ton (2450#) you should have no problem.
     
  3. Gravel Rat

    Gravel Rat LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 9,544

    I wouldn't be too worried about that as a 3/4 ton is usually good for 3000lbs you just want the skid a little forward of the rear axle.

    I have put a full skid of portland cement into a 70s Ford 3/4 ton for a customer the bumper was a little low with 4000lbs in the bed :laugh:
     
  4. EagleLandscape

    EagleLandscape LawnSite Platinum Member
    Male, from Garland, Texas
    Posts: 4,347

    Ive put over 4k in the bed of my 250 before, but i would highly recommend against it. this was serveral years ago and it made my tires look nearly flat.

    are you towing the skidsteer? or putting it in the bed of the truck?
     
  5. THEGOLDPRO

    THEGOLDPRO LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,223

    i toss pallets of mulch/bag salt/wood pellits in mine all the time, those all weigh 2000+ mine has just stock 2500 rear springs, you will be fine.
     
  6. muddstopper

    muddstopper LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,342

    Your F250 probably has a GVW of around 8500lbs. The truck itself is probably around 6000 lbs depending on bed and other options. Looking at those numbers, and according to what some on this site consider taboo if you go over those numbers, you can only put another 2500lbs on your truck.

    Here is the definition from Ford about what the GVW means.
    Gross Vehicle Weight (GVW)
    This is the Base Curb Weight plus actual Cargo Weight plus passengers. It is important to remember that GVW is not a limit or specification . . . it is the actual weight that is obtained when the fully loaded vehicle is driven onto a scale.

    Below is a definition of GVWR and its relationship to GVW.

    Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR)
    This is the maximum allowable weight of the fully loaded vehicle (including passengers and cargo). This number - along with other weight limits, as well as tire, rim size and inflation pressure data - are shown on the vehicle's Safety Compliance Certification Label, located on the left front door lock facing or the door latch post pillar. Note: The GVW must never exceed the
    GVWR.


    And the Gross Axle Weight Rating , (GAWR)) rateing and what is used to determine this rateing.

    GAWR (Gross Axle Weight Rating)
    The weight specified by the vehicle manufacturer as the load-carrying capacity of a single- axle system, front or rear. The GAWR is limited by the lowest individual rating of tires, wheels, springs or the axle itself.
    And,
    Gross Axle Weight Rating (GAWR)
    This is the maximum weight to be carried by a single axle (front or rear). These numbers also are shown on the Safety Compliance Certification Label. The total load on each axle must never exceed its GAWR.


    Improving the G
     
  7. Brad Ent

    Brad Ent LawnSite Member
    Posts: 228

    Verify tire pressure is adjusted to max rating
    Center load in bed
    Take is slow
     
  8. muddstopper

    muddstopper LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,342

    Your F250 probably has a GVW of around 8500lbs. The truck itself is probably around 6000 lbs depending on bed and other options. Looking at those numbers, and according to what some on this site consider taboo if you go over those numbers, you can only put another 2500lbs on your truck.

    Here is the definition from Ford about what the GVW means.
    Gross Vehicle Weight (GVW)
    This is the Base Curb Weight plus actual Cargo Weight plus passengers. It is important to remember that GVW is not a limit or specification . . . it is the actual weight that is obtained when the fully loaded vehicle is driven onto a scale.

    Below is a definition of GVWR and its relationship to GVW.

    Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR)
    This is the maximum allowable weight of the fully loaded vehicle (including passengers and cargo). This number - along with other weight limits, as well as tire, rim size and inflation pressure data - are shown on the vehicle's Safety Compliance Certification Label, located on the left front door lock facing or the door latch post pillar. Note: The GVW must never exceed the
    GVWR.


    And the Gross Axle Weight Rating , (GAWR)) rateing and what is used to determine this rateing.

    GAWR (Gross Axle Weight Rating)
    The weight specified by the vehicle manufacturer as the load-carrying capacity of a single- axle system, front or rear. The GAWR is limited by the lowest individual rating of tires, wheels, springs or the axle itself.
    And,
    Gross Axle Weight Rating (GAWR)
    This is the maximum weight to be carried by a single axle (front or rear). These numbers also are shown on the Safety Compliance Certification Label. The total load on each axle must never exceed its GAWR.


    Increaseing the GAWR can be done by a number of ways. Improving springs, tires or even replacing with a heavier axle. But increaseing one component that makes up the GAWR without similar improvements of the other components, doesnt necessary mean you can just add extra weight. It does no good to add extra heavy spring rates, if you still have low weight ratings on your tires. It also makes no sense to just add heavier tires, if the axles wont support the extra weight. Also consider the brakeing system on the truck, If you increase the GAWR and cant stop the load, you still havent increased the GVWR
     
  9. J&R Landscaping

    J&R Landscaping LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,096

    I would think his gvw would be 9600lbs (which is what my 06 f250 psd is). You should have no problems.
     
  10. Cooter

    Cooter LawnSite Senior Member
    from NE Iowa
    Posts: 510

    I have hauled 5500lbs of scrap steel in the bed on my F-250. Probably wont do it again though.
     

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