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How should I go about seeing sod?

Discussion in 'Turf Renovation' started by 1BadHawk, Jun 17, 2005.

  1. 1BadHawk

    1BadHawk LawnSite Member
    Posts: 127

    A customer if mine had sod put down about two years ago. Little maintenance was done and a lot of it has died off. To look at it now it looks like a babies head. Very thin, fine grass blades, and a light coat of thatch.

    She wants the lawn thick again. I dont imagine aeration is necessary, but I was thinking more along the lines of maual dethatching with some hand rakes and a moderate overseeding. What would be some ways I could put the seed down. I was thinking of a slit seeder, perhaps just spreading it with a spreader? She now has an irrigation system installed and can water at any time. The yard is probably only about 700 sq ft.
     
  2. sildoc

    sildoc LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,925

    700 sq ft I would use a rake to dethatch just quick. Then aerate, fert and over seed. I say aerate because if it is sod then I am guessing that she wanted the cheapest price to begin with and will need lime app(if in clay soil) and fert with it. to many variables to tell for sure.
    Do a soil test first. Start there and add to it.
     
  3. 1BadHawk

    1BadHawk LawnSite Member
    Posts: 127

    Sounds good, thats about what I was thinking.
     
  4. muddstopper

    muddstopper LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,342

    Interesting blanket statement. Sounds if you are saying that all clay soils are low in Ph and calcium content. You might want to restructure your response because that answer, as stated, is incorrect.
     
  5. sildoc

    sildoc LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,925

    Hmm apparently you did not read the entire statement. As Stated do a soil test first.
    Yes most clay soils are low on the PH scale as turf grass goes.
     
  6. sheshovel

    sheshovel LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,112

    Sildoc I beg to differ,clay soils have the most nutrients and minerals...... next to good loam.
     
  7. sildoc

    sildoc LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,925

    Nutrients and minerals have nothing to do with PH. Orange juice is high in nutreints and minerals but has an acidic ph. Urine does also but ranges at a 7.0 ph. It all depends on what the plant is that you are planting. azalias and rodies love acidic soil. Turf grass(like we are talking) like a slight acidic soil 5.5-6.5. Most clay soils that I see run right at 4.0-4.5.
    Again like I say do a soil test first and figure out the exact amount of lime you will need.
     
  8. sheshovel

    sheshovel LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,112

    The higher organic matter content and the more nutreints and minerals the soil contains,the higher the PH usually is..at least that's what I have found.Weather or not it has anything to do with it or not.
     
  9. sildoc

    sildoc LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,925

    You are right. However I don't know about your clay, but ours is very low in organic material. Thus it is called Clay and not Loam.
     
  10. muddstopper

    muddstopper LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,342

    Yea, I read the entire statement. And your statement about the soil test as well. Not knocking your intentions just clarifieing that not all clay soils need lime. But you are correct that only a soil test will tell for sure whether lime is needed or not.
     

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