How to make the grass greener?

Discussion in 'Homeowner Assistance Forum' started by yungman, Jan 23, 2008.

  1. Az Gardener

    Az Gardener LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,899

    Most likely your lawn was overseed with a blend of perennial rye grass. You should only be watering once every 7-10 days as a general rule. The yellow is most likely a combination of too much water and not enough nutrients. The cold has not helped but if your water and fert was correct the lawn would be green.

    Don't add any lime, wrong part of the country, would only make it worse. Try some Ironite first then follow up in a couple of weeks with calcium nitrate. Fertilize every 3-4 weeks rotating products until you get it greened up. Back off as it gets warm unless you like to cut a lot of grass.

    Remember guys he is a homeowner I tried to suggest stuff he could pick up at the depot.
     
  2. LarryF

    LarryF LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,171

    I think he may be pulling your leg. Lesco does sell paint, but usually it's for marking purposes. Nonetheless, Lesco is a great place to buy fertilizer, even for us homeowners. In my opinion, it's the best place.
    http://www.lesco.com/?PageID=87&Category=05
    And they have a much broader selection of fertilizer than you'll find at Home Depot of Lowes. Also, if you can find a Lesco dealer near you, the guy or gal behind the counter will know a lot more about fertilizer and seed than anyone you'll find in the big-box stores. It wouldn't hurt to stop and talk to someone at a Lesco place. Fertilizer with iron (FE) in it will provide a dark, rich-green lawn, as one of the posts mentioned, but it may also stain concrete after a rain if the fert falls on it.

    Before you start buying fertilizer, however, you had better get a good quality spreader. Lesco also has those but they are a bit pricey. Mine's an Earthway, and I think it's very good.
     
  3. Tadams

    Tadams LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 788

    Nope, he's not pulling your leg. They make a paint that you use on dormant grass so your lawn is green instead of brown.
     
  4. bug-guy

    bug-guy LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 966

    i sell it to golf cousres and athlectic fields some time they have a bad spot and even the rye willn't hang in and they will paint it how do you think the field in green bay is green in jan.
     
  5. Landrus2

    Landrus2 LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,812

    Sit by the fire place and call in the pros. I mean wait till warms up.:drinkup:
     
  6. LarryF

    LarryF LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,171

    OK, if you say so, I won't argue. But when I looked at the Lesco site, this is all I found.

    http://www.lesco.com/ProdCatalog/ProdCatalogNav.aspx?ProdGroupID=79

    And although I saw the "Athletic Turf Paint" and "Tournament Turf Marking Paint" listed, I thought that was for marking lines not painting the grass green. I wonder how many thousands of aerosol cans such as shown in that site it would take to paint the Green Bay football field.
     
  7. jmoore16135

    jmoore16135 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 45

    Green "turf paint" is used a lot in the athletic field maintenance industry. It is mainly used for cosmetic purposes, for spot treatments of dead grass and for quick fixes when lining a soccer or football field.

    Back to the original post; the grass is more then likely Bermuda grass and has gone dormant for the winter, hence the brown grass. A couple of options; ride it out and wait for the Bermuda grass to come out of its dormancy and continue with whatever maintenance you plan on doing in the spring; aerate, fert, over seed and top dress. Your other option would be, depending on how cold it is down there, purchase some perennial rye grass, over seed your lawn now and you might get some germination (long shot, being that it is so late in the winter).
    To prevent this from happening next winter, in the fall when the temperatures start to drop down to the 50's, aerate, fert and then over seed with the perennial rye grass.
    Hope that helps.
     

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