How to Print Invoices?

Discussion in 'Business Operations' started by gkell88, Jan 1, 2002.

  1. gkell88

    gkell88 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 55

    We print our invoices on 3 part NCR paper, on an old dot matrix printer. (The hammering of the letters makes the characters go through to the pink copy)

    How do you prefer to generate invoices? Do you use NCR paper to leave the customer a copy? We have always kept a pink copy, left a white copy and a yellow copy with the customer at time of service. Then we bring the pink copy back to the office, and use it as a record of services for the day.

    How do you folks prefer to do it? Can you do it with an ink jet printer?

    Thanks for your input
     
  2. GroundKprs

    GroundKprs LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,969

    Redesign your forms so you can use a laser or inkjet.

    We used 3-part NCR when doing billing by hand, went to 2-part when computerized, because our copy was stored in computer. Hope to redesign ours this winter for credit card bill type of tearoff with our address to fit in return envelope. This is for monthly billing of all maintenance services. Sounds like you are speaking of chemical apps, where your preprinted invoice is actually your route schedule, invoice, and log of work done.

    If that is your use, perhaps use a legal size sheet, with perforated tearoff on bottom for your recording, and perf tearoff on top for the customer to mail in with payment. Similar to a credit card statement.
     
  3. HBFOXJr

    HBFOXJr LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,712

    We do it your way. WE use an Oki 590 printer which self adjusts the pin pressure for the number of copies you are doing. Great print with no puncture.

    I'd like to do a single sheet, maybe legal size with with 2 perfs across it. Bring one back (now pink) and 2 with customer, one of which could be returned with payment.

    Problem I see with that is binding the return paper work. Currently with our old software, we are returning only a work order to the office and my wife must actually enter that info into accounting and create an invoice. She does this on single part, pin feed paper and puts it in a binder. The pink wo goes into a specific application folder for pesticide records or is filed alphabetically if an irrigation service.

    If it is a totally office generated invoice from a wo order not field priced (irrigation repair work) it is done on 3 part ncr and the pink is kept.

    Some of this is going to change with our use of QExpress this year. Still we will stick with 3 part, plain ncr for our stuff initially. We'll probably get custom templates done for the application work.

    If we went with plain single sheet for inkjet or laser how would we bind a retained copy? Secondly, by printing a single sheet, 3 section invoice we'd probably lose some info on our abbreviated, retained hard copy.
     
  4. Kent Lawns

    Kent Lawns LawnSite Senior Member
    from Midwest
    Posts: 870

    Ours are Laser printed on a 3 section form. (perforated)

    We keep the top 3rd to return to the office and the bottom 2 leave with the customer.

    The customer detatches the very bottom and mails it in with their payment.
     
  5. HBFOXJr

    HBFOXJr LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,712

    We've been audited in the past by the state. They looked through our printed invoices to match things up.

    Does anyone know of state or federal requirements on this matter?
     
  6. Kent Lawns

    Kent Lawns LawnSite Senior Member
    from Midwest
    Posts: 870

    It will be a STATE requirement, not federal.

    Check with the dept of ag, but generally they'll look for such things as:

    Site
    Applicator
    Time & Date
    Target pest
    Name of pesticide and common name
    Amount and concentration
    etc.

    Normally keep records 1 year from application date on general use pesticides and 3 years on RUP.

    Again, get a printout from NJDA for exact specs.
     
  7. HBFOXJr

    HBFOXJr LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,712

    Legal requirements for tax purposes, not application work??? Hard copy has made it easy for audits in the past.
     

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