How to remove Ryobi 875r clutch drum?

Discussion in 'Homeowner Assistance Forum' started by bgmiller, Dec 9, 2004.

  1. bgmiller

    bgmiller LawnSite Member
    from bbbb
    Posts: 2

    Hoping someone can offer some asistance or point me in the right direction..

    I'm trying to remove the clutch drum from my Ryobi 875r, but can't figure out how or what tool may be required.

    My Ryobi 875r won't start after working fine for about 2 years. I've tried two new spark plugs in it. I don't see any spark in the gap of the plug when I try pulling the starting rope with the plug removed (the threads of the plug are grounded to the engine). So I assume the problem is in the ignition system. The only obstacle I have so far in getting to the ignition components is the removing the clutch drum.

    I live in Guam (brought with me), so taking it to a shop isn't a good option.

    Thanks,
    Barry
     
  2. j_loppy

    j_loppy LawnSite Member
    Posts: 90

    It takes a small (t15 or t20) torx bit, turned counter clockwise, as seen while you are looking down into the hole on the drum/flex-shaft attatchment. I have also used a small (and long) slotted screwdriver to do this as well. I can't remember, but you may have to put something in the cylinder (through the spark plug hole) to keep the engine from turning.

    Hope this helps...
     
  3. bgmiller

    bgmiller LawnSite Member
    from bbbb
    Posts: 2

    J Loppy,

    Thanks for your help! I had originally tried a larger torx wrench and when that didn't work, assumed it must take another tool. But the #20 fit perfectly. I appreciate it!

    But... now I'm face with removing the clutch. I'm sure once I get the clutch off, my own experience will get me through the rest of the task. Any thoughts?

    Again, thanks a million. Hopefully I'll be able to find the problem and won't have to buy another one!

    Thanks,
    Barry
     
  4. j_loppy

    j_loppy LawnSite Member
    Posts: 90

    You need to remove the spark plug from the cylinder head and take a shoe string and put it inside the cylinder, but leave alittle sticking out so you can remove it later. (the reason for doing this is to keep the piston from moving while you remove the clutch assy.)

    Once the string is in place, face the clutch toward you (i.e. put the muffler exhaust port towards the ground). Next, take a pair of slip joint pliers, grasp the clutch with them, and turn it counter clockwise. It helps to have a helper hold the engine assembly while you turn it, but you may be able to hold it with your feet.

    Don't over torque the new clutch when you put it back on, and use care so as not to damage the clutch shoes or springs. You may want to place a rag on it before using your pliers.

    Good luck.
     
  5. j_loppy

    j_loppy LawnSite Member
    Posts: 90

    I hope you read this, as I read what your initial problem was after I posted the previous reply. If the engine is not firing, I'd say it's safe to say you need an electronic ignition module. (Old mechanics often call this a power pack).
     
  6. dlh2

    dlh2 LawnSite Member
    from Pace Fl
    Posts: 38

    I'm trying to replace a broken pull rope on my Ryobi 790. I've got it all apart, but now I'm having problems getting the recoil spring rewound and in position between the housing and the recoil pulley assembly. Any advice or tricks would be most helpfull!!!!
     
  7. j_loppy

    j_loppy LawnSite Member
    Posts: 90

    If there is anything that requires patience...well, this is it. I've found that spending 5.00 for one that is ready to go is easier, but, knowing how things are, see if this trick helps...sometimes it does and sometimes it doesn't.

    Take a cap from a can of spray paint and cut the open side of it down, so that you make it about an inch deep (i.e. the cap now becomes a jig that holds the spring so that you can wind it up inside the cap)

    Once this is accomplished, be very careful about cutting yourself with the spring (WEAR YOUR SAFETY GLASSES). Once you get it back in the housing, put the rope on, and wind the spring by pulling out some excess rope (don't grab the handle, use the rope under the cord stop), and voila, you're confused, and hopefully finished putting it all back together.

    Good luck.
     
  8. booch123

    booch123 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 1

    :usflag: To bgmiller,
    Not sure if you've solved your no-start problem yet. However, I had a no-start problem just after the 2-year warranty ran out on my 875r. I replaced the sparkplug and had no change. I could get it to run after about 20-30 minutes of pulling and then waiting thru the choke cycle. Well, I checked the spark and that was good. I noticed that you didn't have a spark, so the rest of this may only help you if you still can't get your unit to run after replacing the parts that you have. I then sprayed quick start down the throat of the carb and still no go. I then sprayed it directly into the cylinder and replaced the spark plug and still got no results. I noticed that my primer bulb was already full each time that I'd try to start the unit and found that the bulb was automatically pushing gas back thru the overflow...which indicated the carb chambers might be blocked...however, I'd already proven that the fuel system wasn't the problem. I was racking my brain, so I took the carb apart anyways and cleaned it just in case I was going nuts, and it didn't have an affect on the no-start, but at least the carb was now filling up and spraying into the throat, which it wasn't doing recently. The golden moment came when I glanced through the manual again and noted that the manufacturer chose to highlight the valve adjustment. I figured it couldn't hurt, so I took the valve cover off and actually found that the exhaust valve was too tight and was never closing. This was causing extremely low compression. I adjusted my valves and put the unit back together. That did it!! It started right up, as it should with a new plug and clean carb. I'm not sure why the valve would have actually become tighter and remain open; however, it did adjust and close. I'm guessing that the valve might have been a bit tight from the start and I never really noticed it, because I definitely have more compression than I ever remember this thing having. Of note, I also found that when I had the units top cover off to expose the spark plug wire, I found the wire had a few deep gouges and wear marks from where the sharp plastic had worn through to the cable core. The ignition unit runs approximagely $40-45 dollars, so I used some high temp silicone and coated the whole cable to extend its life. It's running beutifully. I hope some of this helps you to keep your unit alive for another couple of years to get your moneys worth. Best of luck. Paul
     

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