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How to turn down clients you cant take on?

Discussion in 'Starting a Lawn Care Business' started by kebrowns, Dec 11, 2011.

  1. Reflection

    Reflection LawnSite Member
    Posts: 16

    As long as it's a property/customer that you 1) are capable of servicing and 2) will not hate doing the job (this is important) - I would say price the work at a rate that you are satisfied with and put the ball in the customer's court.

    Let them turn you down.
  2. 32vld

    32vld LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,984

    Never believe a price the customer say's they paid last year.

    I had a lady tell me she paid $150 for a fall clean up last year.

    I told her $366. Asked if I could do better. Told her no. I'm not making $366. I'm running a buisness that has expenses to be paid. When my truck or whatever wears out and needs to be replaced if the money is not made to do so just like any other business I'll be out of buisness.

    She paid me the $366.

    Don't be surprised that a nice person would take advantage of you being green by throwing out a low ball number to see if you would take it.

    This is why you must figure out how long it should take to do the job with the right equipment and what you need to charge per hour to give a price for the job, not by the hour.
  3. LindblomRJ

    LindblomRJ LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,570

    If someone thinks they are going to get a deal, nice or not, they will try to make a deal.
  4. 32vld

    32vld LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,984

    I ask again are you booked solid 40 hours of work every week?

    If not why are you giving away customers.

    Who cares if you have to be solo on one property for 8 hours to get the job done.

    Getting more work then you can do solo then you hire a part timer.
  5. ringahding

    ringahding LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 612

    I know the article is for "one time mowing", but I think if you read on you may find your answer. Read this article
  6. kebrowns

    kebrowns LawnSite Member
    Posts: 203

    I am not booked 40hrs per week I am a part timer. I have a fulltime job I work 40-50hrs per week. I Give away customers because I think I don't have the right equipment or enough of it for what size property they have. But I like what you say 32vld. Price it in accordance to what I think its worth and put the ball in there hands and go from there. I also like your point why not doit if it even takes 8hrs. But listening to them swearing up and down its just $140 is just making the whole thing look disappointing. I know I can look other places but I get some calls like that. For example, $110 for a 2 acre yard. With them wanting this and that. and they say thats what they pay.
  7. 32vld

    32vld LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,984

    Just respond that you can't work for that low of a price. Thank them and leave.

    You could ask where is the guy that did it last year for that price. When they say he doesn't answer their calls. You respond he's most likely out of business from not making enough money at that price.

    Then thank them and leave.
  8. Jb3NH

    Jb3NH LawnSite Member
    Posts: 197

    About what i have done and the relationship is good. The other guy has a similar equipment set up. we occasionally share a 'floating' labor pool when things get heavy, as well as co-op on other fixed resources. its a mutually beneficial relationship.
  9. kebrowns

    kebrowns LawnSite Member
    Posts: 203

    thanks ringahding that was good reading.
  10. ralph02813

    ralph02813 LawnSite Bronze Member
    Male, from Charlestown, RI
    Posts: 1,041

    I agree, I would add to this what others have said re evaluate your equipment make sure you have got the perfect gear for the jobs you are doing - save for a 48 or finance it - know your cost of doing business.

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