How wide can I go?

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by bushwoods1, Jul 14, 2003.

  1. bushwoods1

    bushwoods1 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 101

    How wide a tire can I get for a scag 61" W/B Hydro? Do they make a wider tire for it?
    I have 16x6.5 on there now, and have noticed the ruts. The grass is not wet, and the tire pressure is correct. It seems to me that the tire should have a wider footprint like on some of the ztr's to correct this problem.
    I have done a search, and have not found anything that can help with this. Has anyone else come across this problem? Do they offer such a thing? Any thoughts or ideas would be appreciated. Thanks.
     
  2. Doc Pete

    Doc Pete LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,469

    There’s no reason why you can't go up on tire size as long as they clear the frame. Just like a rider, the bigger “wider and taller”, the better. A taller tire gives a longer foot print to keep from falling into holes (front to rear), better traction from more ground contact, and the wider tire does the same thing by adding even more area of ground contact.
    I’m running the same size tires on my WB as the older wright standers. They’re 20x8x8. The tire is over 9 inches wide and gives a very smooth ride. I'm very happy with my setup and the machine handles totally different than with the old smaller tires.
    Pete

    wheel mod.jpg
     
  3. bushwoods1

    bushwoods1 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 101

    Oops :sleeping: I forgot the last number. There 16x6.5x8
    Thanks for your thoughts switchless.
     
  4. Doc Pete

    Doc Pete LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,469

    That's great. Now you can look on the Carlisle website and look for an 18 or 20 inch tire with an 8 inch diameter (your rim size) and as big as you want. I'm using the "turf matte" style tire that is very soft and a rounded edge which goes a long way to avoid marring the grass.
    Pete
     
  5. FrankenScagMachines

    FrankenScagMachines LawnSite Platinum Member
    from IN
    Posts: 4,739

    Pete you forgot to mention that the extra diameter will increase speed :cool:
     
  6. Doc Pete

    Doc Pete LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,469

    You mean that's a bad thing;) ;) .... That's just part of the fun, right????:p Aren't you the one that wants to increase the speed of that orange pig above 7 mph:D :D
     
  7. FrankenScagMachines

    FrankenScagMachines LawnSite Platinum Member
    from IN
    Posts: 4,739

    Hehehe......
    Yah it's terrible :p
    I'm pretty sure it is maxing out at 6mph. In the wintertime I clocked it at about 5.5 bu then it was cold out and the hydros weren't warmed up good... I went out and looked, no room for larger diameter tires on mine, but wider might work...
     
  8. A1 Lawn@Landscapes

    A1 Lawn@Landscapes LawnSite Member
    Posts: 220

    Won't the larger tire affect the level of the deck ?
    Just curious
     
  9. Doc Pete

    Doc Pete LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,469

    For sure. If it's a floater deck, just readjust the rear pins. If it's a fixed deck you can just unbolt the deck and reinstall it using the lower holes, or raise the front end a bit and put a spacer or two under the blades.
    Pete
     
  10. Larger (wider) tires will help the rut problem caused by heavy-tracking. If they’re significantly wider, you’ll lose some of the mower’s ability to trim around objects. “But it’s better to float good than to trim good, you’ll float marvelous.”

    In addition to the wider tires, be sure to stagger your mowing tracks. Sometimes changing the cutting direction is just not practical, like on long narrow strips. Usually the first cut along a curb or a fence will be nearly the same. But you should alternate the track of the second pass around obstacles. It depends on the width of your tires, I alternate my mowing path by thirds. One week, instead of mowing the second pass a full cut-width over from the first, I’ll overlap 2/3rds of the cut-width on the second pass (one rear tire width over) and then a full cut-width each successive pass relative to that second pass. The next week, I’ll only overlap 1/3rd of the cut-width (twice the rear tire width over) on the second pass and then a full cut-width each successive pass.

    Alternating (staggering) your tire tracks will minimize those rows of ruts you see on so many accounts. Not only do those ruts make a LCO look like a rookie, they take forever to work out, and the compacted soil makes it easier for weeds to get a start right down the rut-rows.
     

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