How would you approach this grass and weed

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by Basilhayden, Jan 24, 2010.

  1. Basilhayden

    Basilhayden LawnSite Member
    Posts: 69

    problem? This yard was sodded with centipede grass. It has several small areas of bare spots caused by various things including possibly shade, heavy equipment being used on it, etc. The weeds are becoming more of a problem lately. What would be your best guess with the limited information that I can give? Should I overseed the whole yard with something or just the bare spots? Should I use some type of weed and feed? How would you handle it? Thanks

    NEWGUYRI LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 594

    I would aerate/overseed the entire yard. Then I would also apply some kind of weed control. That should get the yard in optimal condition.
  3. Hoy landscaping

    Hoy landscaping LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 836

    if your state does not require a fert. license, like PA! go out and buy some weed control. it hooks up to a hose and ya spray the lawn or the weed spots.
  4. towtruck212

    towtruck212 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 182

    Do you say PA does or does not require a license?
  5. dyerlawnservice

    dyerlawnservice LawnSite Member
    from East TN
    Posts: 51

    it reads as PA does NOT have a fert. liscense
  6. Grnhed

    Grnhed LawnSite Member
    Posts: 61

    I guess I have several questions first? I hope you dont mind?
    1. What does the customer want or expect?
    2. Sure you have to knock down the weeds, are they grassy or broadleaf?
    3. If you over-seed why not over-seed with a centipede cultivar? In only the bad spots? It will ship out of Georgia.
    4. How soon does the customer want to see a difference or a fix?
    5. Does the customer think/feel your responsible for the problem at all?
    6. With the shade issue, can you thin the canopy above? If so, can you pass along the cost to the customer? If shade IS AN issue, why didn't whoever sold, and installed the sod, have that conversation with the customer about the light requirements of centipede?
    7. What is the ultimate goal for the customer? A putt-able surface? just an open green palate that will finally be a base for mixed beds or other defined areas in the yard? A general play area for kids and the dog? I am assuming this is a residential area not commercial? If its commercial I have some other questions.
    I really am not trying to be difficult, just trying to understand and maybe help
    8. Centipede spreads with stolons, once you address the issues do you have time to let the centipede just grown in?

    PS, sorry, You say several small areas, define several and SMALL please?
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2010
  7. Basilhayden

    Basilhayden LawnSite Member
    Posts: 69

    it is a friends yard that I will probably start cutting this summer. I have never cut it before. It is grassy weeds for the most part. The turf has been abused b/c of tree removal and large machines tearing the yard up, cars taking out the edges, etc. They aren't in a huge hurry to have it fixed. I thought about maybe weeding and feeding and then overseeding.
  8. Grnhed

    Grnhed LawnSite Member
    Posts: 61

    Probably the best route, if he's a friend and in a hurry, let him buy the seed from
    Or JUST feed it really well and it will grow in just fine since it sounds like you remove the LIGHT issue.

  9. Richard Martin

    Richard Martin LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 14,700

    Everybody carefully read what I'm going to write.

    Most states DO NOT require a license to apply fertilizer. But... Applying fertilizer is the only thing you are allowed to do. YOU MAY NOT APPLY ANY WEED CONTROLS WITHOUT A LICENSE.

    This includes fertilizers with weed controls as part of the application. If you get caught applying any weed control, whether it is part of a fertilzer application or not, you will in all likelihood, be heavily fined.

    Specifically, Pennsylvania requires a license for Lawn and turf—The use of a pesticide in the maintenance or production of lawn and turf. That is from

    As far as I know the states and the Federal government draw no distinction between a pesticide and a herbicide. In the eyes of the law they are the same thing.

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