Hunter HBV 101E's

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by F6Hawk, May 25, 2005.

  1. F6Hawk

    F6Hawk LawnSite Member
    Posts: 195

    What is a good price for these valves, and are they overkill for a residential irrigation system running on city water at approx 60-65 psi? If these are not appropriate, what valves do you recommend for said application?
     
  2. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 48,022

    Use good standard valves you have confidence in, and have confidence you can get repair parts for, ten years from now. These aren't the ones. Hunter buys them from an outside vendor.
     
  3. F6Hawk

    F6Hawk LawnSite Member
    Posts: 195

    Unfortunately, I don't have any confidence in any, at this point. Still doing my research on what brands of stuff to use for my install. But thanks for the advice. The reason I was even considering them is they looked like something that would last for YEARS, and I may be able to get them for around $30 each.
     
  4. jerryrwm

    jerryrwm LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,274

    Not sure if a brass valve is necessary for a residential system, or even for small commercial projects.

    Rainbird PE; Weatermatic 21000; Hunter ICV; are all good commercial grade valves. Reliable, and a sure supply of repair parts.

    There are other valves out there that will work well for many years on a residential system and they are a lot less expensive. Rainbird DV, Weathermatic 12000, Hunter PGV, and Irritrol 2500 (Old 205), and even the Toro 250-06-04 (which is the best thing Toro ever sold).

    Check availability in your area for supply houses.

    Jerry R
     
  5. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 48,022

    Even if they gave them away, it wouldn't be worth it. Just as a heads up, there is one valve that's been imitated. And that's Irritrol. Born as Richdel, they are now owned by Toro, and carry a new name (being that Toro bought a lot of names, and uses them as they see fit) Likely enough, your grandchildren will be able to repair the Irritrol valve you install today. The 2500TF is the best version of this valve, having a bolted-on cover with a flow control. The more common 2400T jar-top would also be fine. If your system is an all-PVC one, those are often done with glued-in-place valves, and those have the letter S in place of the T (to indicate slip connections instead of threaded)
     
  6. jerryrwm

    jerryrwm LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,274

    Not sure if a brass valve is necessary for a residential system, or even for small commercial projects.

    By Years how long are you talking? I have Weathermatic 21000 series that I installed 25 yrs ago and they might have changed a solenoid or diaphragm on some of them over the years. Good life expectancy might be 10 - 12 yrs.

    Rainbird PE; Weatermatic 21000; Hunter ICV; are all good commercial grade valves. Reliable, and a sure supply of repair parts.

    There are other valves out there that will work well for many years on a residential system and they are a lot less expensive. Rainbird DV, Weathermatic 12000, Hunter PGV, and Irritrol 2500 (Old 205), and even the Toro 250-06-04 (which is the best thing Toro ever sold).

    Check availability in your area for supply houses.

    Jerry R
     
  7. bicmudpuppy

    bicmudpuppy LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,781

    Valve wear is a very funny thing. The rubber can last 15+, but you may find a single valve go bad in as little as 7 or 8. Water quality makes a bid difference here and your WM 2100's are great valves depending on vinatage. Weather tragic keeps playing w/ things they don't understand. They wanted to "improve" the rubber, so we got about 3 years of rubber that was the worst product yet. They design and re-design the solenoids, and I think if you've got a valve from about 8+ years ago, you've got the best solenoids they've made. Time will tell with these newest ones. And I don't mean to pick on WM, most manuractures out there do this to us. I think the exception here would be Hardie/Richdel/Irritrol (and NO, now that Toro owns them, you can't include Toro). The closest thing to a bad product I've seen Hardie let out the door was the XL Rotor, and I liked them. Evidently, that pulse pause was to expensive to remain competitive and we got the CR500 instead......excellent trade IMHO.
     
  8. F6Hawk

    F6Hawk LawnSite Member
    Posts: 195

    Wel, I appreciate all the replies. Seems the concensus is to go with the more common plastic valves. Ok, so in regards to those, is it important at all to go with a straight-thru valve, so as to reduce pressure loss? And what about an anti-siphon feature? Is this necessary/suggested?

    I am going to have a separate meter installed just for my sprinklers, and the meter has a built-in BFP device, according to the city folks. So according to the city water folks, that is the only BF device I need, but I wasn't sure if it might be prudent to have them at the manifold, just in case.

    Is the Irritrol 2713 DPR a good valve? It is one that changes water direction by 180° instead of passing it straight thru. I might have access to some at a good price, but have no knowledge of their quality/practicality.

    And since I am getting so much good advice, let me ask about my intentions on my manifold... I was planning on putting a box in the ground for the manifold, almost directly under the waterproof controller housing. This would make my wire run very short (6 feet or so), with all the valves in one location. Is this a good way to do it? I know many run the wires with the pipe to remote valves, not sure why exactly. I am looking at having 3-4 zones right now, with more in the future, when I expand the system to include my back yard.

    Thanks again!
     
  9. F6Hawk

    F6Hawk LawnSite Member
    Posts: 195

    I just read on Hunter's site, using the PGV 1" valves as a guide, that the globe-type valves actually have more of a pressure drop (1.9 psi @ 15 GPM) than the angled version (1.0 psi @ 15 GPM). So I guess that takes care of the globe/angle decision for me. Appears not to make too much of a difference, in spite of what I thought the results would be.
     

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