HYDRO WALK BEHIND MOWERS

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by jcanada, Apr 5, 2000.

  1. Evan528

    Evan528 LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,144

    i no that! the hills i am talking about i am estimating the degrees... all i no is that there very close to beins strait op!(90*)
     
  2. cjcland

    cjcland LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 278

    / see that slash thats about 65-70 degrees<p>----------<br>CJC Landscape Management<br>Winter Haven, Florida<br>
     
  3. cjcland

    cjcland LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 278

    i would also like to know where your oil is during all this mountain climbing<p>----------<br>CJC Landscape Management<br>Winter Haven, Florida
     
  4. geogunn

    geogunn LawnSite Gold Member
    from TN
    Posts: 3,010

    thanks evan528 for the confirmation that belt drives can cut hills. I wont hazzard a guess what degree steepness that I can cut but if I can't cut it with my machine, there isn't a hydro out there that can either.<p>gravity is just that. the same gravity that sucks my LESCO down the hill will suck any exmark, toro, JD, ...you name it, maybe even quicker.<p>all of us need to be careful on hills!!!<p>GEO
     
  5. Retro67

    Retro67 Banned
    Posts: 207

    I'd like to see a walkbehind on some of the hills I've mowed with my Ferris IS/Z. I thought of the conversation when some of you joked about chaining a goat to a hill. &lt;p&gt;I love my walkbehind, but it can't hold a candle to hillside operation of my Z. There are a few things it does really well and hillsides is one of them. I've been on 45 degree slopes and had no problems, other than feeling like I was defying gravity. My grandfather's property has a hill that is probably around 60 degrees, but I would never let anything go down it that I wanted to come back up. I think some of the estimates I've heard are incorrect, at best.<p>&lt;p&gt;John
     
  6. geogunn

    geogunn LawnSite Gold Member
    from TN
    Posts: 3,010

    retro--I am not familiar with your mower. can you explain why it does so well on slopes that are so steep that it is hard to stand on? <p>do you use an up and down hill pattern...diagonal...etc.? what's the trick?<p>thanks.<p>GEO
     
  7. Retro-<p>In your just one year in business what machine works better on hills your NEW 36&quot; toro hydro, your NEW 48&quot;<br>ferris hydro w/ sulky or your NEW 61&quot; ferris<br>ZTR?<p>How did that quarter acre strip mall job turn out? Were you the low bidder?
     
  8. Retro67

    Retro67 Banned
    Posts: 207

    Geo-<p>The IS/Z has the lowest center of gravity in its class. If you mow flat land, this isn't even an issue. If you mow on hills, it is a big issue. <p>If a machine is top heavy it has a tendency to want to go down the hill. If the weight is distributed lower, it will have more weight over the drive wheels.<p>Some of the accounts I am talking about I can mow &quot;through the ditch&quot; others are still as steep, but are much narrower and must be mowed along the ditch.<p>Stone- I was given the opportunity to beat their current lowball price of $275 per month for three properties. I passed since my work doesn't come that cheap. They were all different sizes, one about 6,000 and another maybe 1/2 acre. I would not have done them for less than twice that price. Everyone has his price, though. I had another one, 3/4 acre Super 8 motel, wanted me to do it for $80 per month. HAHAHAHA. What do these people think? <p>Also, the Toro is &quot;less than ideal&quot; on hills that you must traverse horizontally (short, steep drainage ditches). The tiny drive wheels are part of the problem, along with the fact it is a 36&quot; which is a terribly narrow stance to expect much traction on a hill.<p>Ferris knows how to build a hydro walkbehind. This should be no surprise. Until they put it in their machine in the 80's, all the walkbehinds were belt drives. I almost forgot, you don't own a hydro, do you? You said before, why, but I have forgotten.<p>It amazes even me how much I have learned in such a short time. Of course, in all fairness, I have been in the business much longer than one year. I took a long hiatus, but spent several years in the business previously. Now I have the one thing I didn't have back then. The best type of equipment available for each specific job.<p>Also, don't be so quick to discount my expertise. Admittedly, you spend very little time pursuing this part of the business and I probably spend a disproportianately large amount of time on &quot;fact finding missions.&quot;<p><br>If I had your mechanical abilities to repair machines, I would not know much about new, either. However, it would be too costly and time consuming for me to learn at this point, even if I had the interest.&lt;p&gt;John<br>
     
  9. paddy

    paddy LawnSite Member
    Posts: 67

    i think if your gonna get a belt drive the only option is a toro. this thing has postive drive, when i back it off my truck, i just set the engine to 1000 RPM, and clamp down on the T-Bar, it won't run away. and when you make turns, unless your backing it up in between, you just lean into it with your shoulder, your shoulder is a much bigger muscle than your hand, that means less fatigue
     
  10. geogunn

    geogunn LawnSite Gold Member
    from TN
    Posts: 3,010

    paddy--how does that t-bar do when you need to raise the front of the deck to go over an obstacle in your path like an iron pin or a rock.<p>there are lots of great belt drive out there as options. to many to list here.<p>GEO
     

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