Hydroseeding problems!!

Discussion in 'Turf Renovation' started by lawnboy, Aug 17, 2006.

  1. lawnboy

    lawnboy LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 321

    Hydroseeding problems- ok this is the first year we have hydroseeded, and still learning. The lawns that we have done seem to do really well in the shade areas, but in the sun areas the weeds grow faster than the grass. The rye comes up within a week, but then it is like the grass stunts and stops, then the weeds grow and take over. We are buying the expensive seed from lesco also!! Any ideas on what I am doing wrong and what i need to change. All the lawns even at the begining of spring look rough.
     
  2. GreenUtah

    GreenUtah LawnSite Senior Member
    from SLC, UT
    Posts: 866


    what are you using as a starter fert and mulch? Please tell me it's not hay.
     
  3. lawnboy

    lawnboy LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 321

    lol, your not suppose to use hay?? Just kidding it is hydromulch with tack.
     
  4. GreenUtah

    GreenUtah LawnSite Senior Member
    from SLC, UT
    Posts: 866

    and for the fert?

    don't laugh, there are plenty of hydroseeders with bale shredders on them that guys think is for hay. Then they wonder why the lawns come in looking like alfalfa.
     
  5. lawnboy

    lawnboy LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 321

    i think the problem could be the hydroseed isnt getting into the soil enough. When i look at the lawns it looks like the hydroseed is still sitting on top of the soil and hasnt germinated.
     
  6. muddstopper

    muddstopper LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,342

    Just a couple of suggestions,
    First, what method are you useing for spraying. Are you spraying out and trying to reach as far as you possibly can, or are you spraying directly into the soil. From the sound of it, if you are seeing a lot of seed laying ontop of the soil, you probably need to redirect your pray pattern so that you are spraying more directly into the soil. I spray straight down as i walk around the lawns. I like to see a little slurry just sort of rolling out in front of my spray path. I walk in semi circles spraying this way and then will turn around and spray side to side like this # #tic tak toe pattern. This insures good seed to soil contact as well as even coverage.

    Second, how much fertilizer are you using. When hydroseeding, your seed doesnt have the benefit of the soil as buffer between it and the fertilizer. Fertilizer, especally ferts that have a high salt content, can slow and even reduce seed germination rates. Also you are only treating the top layer of the soil with your hydroseeder slurry, for this reason, you should reduce your fertilizer rates. Plant your seed for optimum establishment and worry about excellerating the growth after it has germinated
     
  7. Mike33

    Mike33 LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,649

    What kind of mulch are you using blend or paper? I do loke to paint it on and when i move back i fan it back over the area. The mulch application is very important, do you have it where you barely can not see any soil. What are your weather conditions there hot and dry? If your area is like mine nothing is growing .
    Mike
     
  8. rider

    rider LawnSite Member
    from ohio
    Posts: 152

    How are you prepping your soil. Soil prep is number one with seed selection number two.
    water water water, shade = dew. dew= water
    Fertilizer 18-24-12 , 18-46-0 or 19-19-19
     
  9. lawnboy

    lawnboy LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 321

    i spray directley down, dont use fertilizer now, because i thought that could of been the problem. No difference though in results. We hand rake the soil, it is a compost blend topsoil that we use normally but not always. We use a blend mulch, with tack. i do have it close to where you cant see any soil, is that right??? Thanks for your input guys.
     
  10. muddstopper

    muddstopper LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,342

    My next thought would be insufficient moisture. You say the areas in the shade are doing alright but not in the full sun areas. Soil temperatures and moisture evaporation in the full sun areas will be much higher than in the shaded areas. Irriagation does two things, it provides moisture and it cools the soil. Try varying your irrigation times to see if you can find a better watering schedule. Shorter watering times but more frequently until the grass establishes and then longer times and less frequently to promote deeper root growth. Maybe running the irrigation system a little longer in the hottest part of the day to compensate for moisture loss by evaporation and to reduce soil temperature. If you choose this method, just be sure you stop watering long enough before dark to give the soil some time to dryout and breath, this will help reduce your chance of fungus. If you fail to let the surface dry out so that there is no water standing or the ground stays saturated, you will see fungus.
     

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