Hydroseeding???

Discussion in 'Turf Renovation' started by Stonewall83, Jul 24, 2008.

  1. Stonewall83

    Stonewall83 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 3

    Is this a good business to get into vs. lawn maitanence?? What kind of costs are involved as far as machinery goes? Any special licensing? Also how steady is the work I would imagine not very with the housing market down??

    thanks guys
    Charlie Williams
     
  2. Turboguy

    Turboguy LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,967

    Charlie,

    I will agree with you that with housing starts being so down it has affected the hydroseeding business. I have found with the hydro seeding part of my business new lawn installs are few and far between but there is still a lot of hydroseeding business out there. I find I am doing more commercial and more lawn repairs where they have torn up a lawn or need to redo it for some reason. Still I am staying quite busy.

    One thing I would recommend quite highly if you do decide to get into hydroseeding is that you join the Hydroseeding Association. You will get enough business from that membership to pay the $ 100 fee dozens and dozens of times over. I am averaging about 2-3 jobs a week from my membership and I hear of guys who get even more work from it. If you want to check it out go to hydroseeding.org and there is info.

    Machines are available starting at about 4 grand or even less up to anything you want to spend. Most all the machines on the market these days do a good job. I would suggest you start with something in the 300 gallon range. That is small enough for renovation jobs and big enough for most anything you will run into in residential or commercial work. You can always go to a bigger machine as your business grows.
     
  3. Stonewall83

    Stonewall83 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 3

    When you say repair are you talking about ruts in a yard or digging for cable???What if I only need 20 gallons will the 300 gallon tank still work??
    Im thinking this might be more profitable than the maintenance side of it...
    Keep talking Im liking it more and more
     
  4. Turboguy

    Turboguy LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,967

    When I was talking about repair it could be that. In case it helps you I will go through some of the last jobs I did and describe them. It would probably bore someone with little interest but might help you know more what I am talking about.

    My last job was one where they put a new deck on a house and tore up a big part of the back yard. The owner decided to redo the back yard totally. The job was about 16,000 sq ft.

    The job before was where they had to tear up a front lawn for a utility service. The job was about 2000 sq. ft

    The one before was a new apartment complex with not much grass but a steep hillside in the back that was nearly vertical. I sprayed crown vetch over about 3000 sq ft.

    The one before was a H.S. football field reseeding heavily trafficked areas with grass. One load.

    The one before was a house where they had put sewage in. About 1800 sq ft.

    A H.S. practice football field. They had planted it about 5 years before using a drill seeder and had rows of grass about 7" apart that never filled in.

    A partial redo on a lawn. About 3/4 acre.

    2 jobs at a H.S. Football field where they built new bleachers and needed seeding around the bleachers. First they had me do the home side then called me back to do the visitor side.

    Two neighboring jobs with new sewers.

    About 4 loads to provide erosion control on the site of a New Tractor Supply Store being built here. Will have more work here later.

    As to your question about mixing a small quantity of seed yes, I can do that without much problem. The smallest job I recall was about 30 sq ft of crown vetch ($ 250). He called everyone he could find and I was the only one who would come out and do it. I have done lots of jobs that were 100 sq ft or so and they can be very profitable, particularly if you can tie them in with other jobs nearby.

    Hope this helps a bit.
     

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