I noticed something very interesting yesterday about my fuel mileage

Discussion in 'General Industry Discussions' started by Richard Martin, Apr 20, 2013.

  1. TTS

    TTS LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 615

    Very interesting research here richard. To everyone claiming how inaccurate these gauges are you need to realize it doesn't matter. I believe the gauges are fairly accurate because I have experience with a similar gauge, the fuel economy is determined off of ODBII by comparing the flow at the fuel injectors to the speed of the vehicle. Even if the gauge was reading that he was getting 100mpg it's not the accuracy that's important it's the change with different trailer. Because of the way the gauge calculates fuel consumption it's actually much more accurate in determining the % of change than doing it longhand. Again the actual MPG isn't important but improving economy by 15-20% is a very valuable discovery.
     
  2. GMLC

    GMLC LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,353

    I didnt read all the posts so I hope this hasnt been mentioned.

    Just my opinion as an ex-master tech. When driving your vehicle it is always learning your driving style to configure shift points and shift timing. Im guessing your truck has learned your style with a trailer on and with extra weight. I would bet if you drove your truck without a trailer for a week or two you would find smoother, longer shifts and better gas mileage.

    I could be wrong here but I remember customers complaining of harsh shifting and bad mileage after towing heavy loads for long periods then driving without the load. It always cleared up after a couple weeks.
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    Last edited: Apr 24, 2013
  3. Richard Martin

    Richard Martin LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 14,700

    If you wanna see long shifts, try a 4L60E in tow mode. Ugh. It's tough to drive this truck without a trailer for more than a couple of hours at a time. It pulls a trailer 5 and sometimes 6 days a week. I'm increasing the fuel mileage while it's towing. Non towing mileage is over 20 highway and around 18 combined city/highway.
     
  4. Richard Martin

    Richard Martin LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 14,700

    Mine came in yesterday. They are very nicely made. Nice clean welds and they're both the same size. The "feet" are nice and long. They're also very wide at around 20 inches. They're also very strong there's little to no give in them when the Dixie rolls over them. I'm going to make up a chain for each one and attach it to my Faststraps bracket. Once I have the chain setup there won't be any time penalty for using these versus a normal gate/ramps. It will take a little getting used to looking in the rearview mirror and not seeing the old trailer gates but I'll get used to it. I'll take a couple of pics when I'm done.
     
  5. Ridin' Green

    Ridin' Green LawnSite Fanatic
    Male, from Michigan
    Posts: 13,315

    Richard, I'm with you on this. More mileage is always good thing.

    I mowed for years with a 5X8" trailer with enclosed sides, and I used ramps like those to load/unload my mower. Just make sure to cinch them up tight to the trailer before driving on and off, because when you drive off the trailer at the rear like that, it tends to squat down some (even the longer ones like I have now, or you have), which tends to push the ramps out away from the rear edge where they rest. I've had them actually drop off on one side or the other when I was driving either up or down them. Fortunately I never tumbled the machine due to it, and I soon fixed the problem so that it didn't happen again.

    In fact, today I am having my trailer gate modified to change the break over angle, and also have some quick drop jack legs welded to the rear side corners to keep the rear from sagging down when driving on and off, which can bend the frame rails over time since the axles act like a fulcrum point, with the tongue/hitch being the opposite anchor point.
     
  6. precision8m

    precision8m LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 349

    My open trailer has a back gate that folds down towards the back so that it sits about as high as my 20" sides. I bought this trailer based on the gate because I knew there would be times when I needed to drive it long distances with little or no weight in it. You could feel the difference in drag. I ended up having a cage made for the front of the trailer (it is removable) and the first time I drove it down the highway on a windy day, I thought I wouldn't be able to go faster than 55! That cage killed my mileage, but I have to be able to store and lock up small equipment somewhere.
     
  7. dstifel

    dstifel LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 915

    Just bought a 6x12 enclosed and surprisingly it only dropped my mpg by 1.5-2 vs regular driving. And that is behind my Dakota. When I have borrowed my buddies 6x12 open with a TALL gate in the past it drops it by 3-4. The gates are deff the problem if u ask me
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  8. Andrew & Ben's Lawn Care

    Andrew & Ben's Lawn Care LawnSite Member
    Posts: 141

    Richard, I had a 1995 F150 with a small block V8 and an automatic transmission. Engine and Transmission were in great condition. I did have a bed cap on it. Best mileage I could get city or highway with no trailer was 14 mpg. With my BigTex single axle trailer loaded to capacity I got 11 mpg around town. This was over the course of 4 years. Last year I bought a 2006 F250 Diesel...people can say what they want, but I spend 100.00 LESS per month in fuel, have much more power to get up and moving. My A/C doesn't cut out when I accelerate, and I've been able to greatly increase my service area, and make more money. Don't step over a dollar to pick up a quarter; change trucks.
     
  9. Blade Runners

    Blade Runners LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,021

    I have the exact same truck. It won't even pull my trailer now.
     
  10. 32vld

    32vld LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,984

    That closed trailer is a flat front or a V front?
     

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