I think I'm dealing with a fungus.

Discussion in 'Turf Renovation' started by mnglocker, May 16, 2013.

  1. mnglocker

    mnglocker LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 758

    Anyone recognize what this could be? The location is a 2nd ring suburb of Minneapolis Mn, the soil is very sandy and has also had an invasion of moles in the neighborhood this year.

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  2. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,080

    Could be from the inability to survive the winter due to lack of carbohydrate storage last Fall... After the drought last Summer we had another dry October and if it weren't for the heavy snow and the slow soaking melt in this Spring I believe many lawns will have looked like that... especially on the sand...
     
  3. mnglocker

    mnglocker LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 758

    So I should probably core sample the dead spots vs. the good spots. If the dead spots are all sand, and the live spots have some black dirt... problem solved?
     
  4. FdLLawnMan

    FdLLawnMan LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,179

    How old us the lawn? What type of grass survived, KBG, PRG or fescue. How long was if covered with snow? To many variables for me to answer.
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  5. mnglocker

    mnglocker LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 758

    The lawn is at least 60 years old. Mostly just k31 tall fescue. It's a mpls suburb. So lots of snow too long, then no snow and then snow, then no snow and snow.
     
  6. FdLLawnMan

    FdLLawnMan LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,179

    If it was mostly K31 fescue count your blessing's, that stuff is crap. Snow mold probably got it.
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  7. americanlawn

    americanlawn LawnSite Fanatic
    from midwest
    Posts: 5,843

    Ditto. This tired lawn should have been seeded/renovated last fall with improved cultivars of turf-type tall fescue. Core aeration also, Best mole trap = the "mole eliminator" trap. my 2 cents
     
  8. RigglePLC

    RigglePLC LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,788

    I suspect the problem is perennial ryegrass--it did not survive last year's drought. Maybe some tall fescue remains. And some areas along the curb survived which got a bit more water from the street drainage. And there was slight protection from the shade in spots. Which way is north and south? I am trying to estimate the directions and time of day by looking at the shadow under the car. I need real data. Is that healthy grass just to the east of the blue spruce tree? (Shaded from the hot afternoon sun?) Keep in mind that the tree roots will pull moisture out of the undertree area soil on the sunny side of the tree. This is called "root burn"; the grass dies as the tree takes the water--mainly on the south side of the tree. Shade of the tree protects the opposite side.
    Look carefully. I suspect the area on the right...is the neighbor's lawn; its fine, probably because they watered their grass a few times, during the hot spell.

    Simplest thing to do is replace with high-quality tall fescue sod. If they won't go for the instant beauty, (and you don't need an instant check)...seed with tall fescue (Titanium II, maybe). and (include some rye for quicker customer satisfaction). Don't expect great results, as it is a spring seeding, and the customer appears to be incapable of watering much.

    Looks like heavy crabgrass along the sidewalk.
     
  9. mnglocker

    mnglocker LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 758

    The car is parked on on east west road and is pointed east. The top pic is a panoramic. There's a large norway pine in the corner of the lot and some el-cheapo spaded in 4" junk that the city dropped in a few years back.
     
  10. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,080

    The lawn was spaded in with 4" of cheap soil, a few years back and yet the lawn is 60 years old???

    I've come across many patches like that myself this Spring and I thought they were just late to get started, but now it looks as though they were drought stressed enough to die in the winter... these were ALL just on the outer fringes of areas that were watered less often... the inner areas that were really watered often had no such patches at all...
     

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