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Ideal block for 15 ft high wall?

Discussion in 'Hardscaping' started by mrusk, Feb 17, 2006.

  1. mrusk

    mrusk LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,260

    I might have a chance to bid a 80 ft long 15ft high retaining wall at a residential house. I have not spoken with the homeowner yet, another contractor working at the house passed my info on to them. He passed my info on to them before i knew how high the wall needed to be.

    In my mind it makes perfect sense to use redi rock for this job. After the base is level i think i could build this wall in 2-3 days with a helper. And i'll save a ton of time on excavation and not using geo grid. I just don't know if the homeowner will go for it. It just seems like it will be 10 times more work to use typical keystone block. The other contractor told me access is 'real bad'. Redi rock might be alot more cost efficent if i can just crane it in.

    BTW i know the wall will need to be engineered and this is not my first wall ever. I've built a ton of walls, just never this tall.

    If the home owner calls me and i go look at it i'll post more info. This job could really start my spring off well, or could put me out of my business. But belive me, if i see the site and have any doubt in my mind about being 100% capable of doing this wall i plan to pass.

  2. YardPro

    YardPro LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,563

    you will have to do whatever the engineer says...

    i have never seen a wall that tall without grid..but am not familliar with redi rock.
  3. kris

    kris LawnSite Bronze Member
    from nowhere
    Posts: 1,579

    Im not familiar with redi rock either but why wouldnt you need geo grid?

    You will defiantly need it engineered.
  4. cgland

    cgland LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,929

    There is no SRW made that can go 15 ft high w/o using grid. The tallest I know of is Monumental Block by Techo and it's max height is 10-12'

  5. mrusk

    mrusk LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,260

    Redi rock can go 13-15 feet with out grid. Redi rock is the big blocks that weigh over a ton a peice.

  6. cedarcroft

    cedarcroft LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 442

    redi rock is the way to go in that situation. I don't know if it is too appealing for a residential application though. we just did a big wall and I wish we used redi rock. we used Anchor wall blocks (jumbos) which are good but not really what should be used.
    regarding the redi rock, I was talking to a guy who does alot of municipal work in and around NYC and they use some sort of custom deadman system to tie the redi rock into the slope when the wall gets high. I will find out more next time I speak to him.
  7. GreenMonster

    GreenMonster LawnSite Silver Member
    from NH
    Posts: 2,702

    A 15' wall doesn't immediately mean Redi-rock is the ideal block. IMHO, redi rock looks like sh!t in a residential application. There are a lot of SRW's out there, much higher than 15' tall. Sure, they require reinforcement, and may cost more, but it doesn't mean it's not possible. Lots of homeowners are willing to spend the money for Versa, Anchor, Keystone, AB or another style of SRW that would look nicer.

    Find out what they'd rather have, if their budget will allow it, determine if you have the ability, get it engineered, then build it.
  8. cedarcroft

    cedarcroft LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 442

    I am not saying that redi rock is the only way. there are plenty of walls around here that are much higher than 15' and they use regular wall block. a company around here called WallArt does all the monster walls and they have many that are super high. Iam just saying that redi rock is the easiest and fastest way to do it. for a residence it would be stupid.

    LANDSCAPER30 LawnSite Member
    from IN
    Posts: 105

    I think Keystone block would work very well for the installation. When a Keystone wall is installed correctly, they can hold back a lot of earth.
  10. nac

    nac LawnSite Member
    Posts: 126

    That wall woundn't be in Montville? would it?

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