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I'm no expert, but fill me in

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by smcunningham, Dec 11, 2006.

  1. smcunningham

    smcunningham LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 773

    How come I see alot of the major landscape companies laying sod plantining
    grass this time of the year....brickman,Rupperts out laytonsville
  2. procut

    procut LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,853

    Its called dormant seeding. The seed is dormant in the cold weather. The frost will get some of it, but the rest will germinate in the spring when the warm temps. arrive. Pretty much the same thing with the sod.
  3. mdvaden

    mdvaden LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,944

    The fact that it can be cut and delivered says something.

    But I don't like laying it this time of year.

    Maybe they figure that if it doesnt dehydrate, it can control some erosion - maybe get them their paycheck.

    It seems to work, but it's probably not the ideal way to approach landscape installation.

    The latest I've installed sod, was probably a November.

    Anybody here ever installed in in winter, and got some kind of roots to grow into the ground - at all?
  4. Runner

    Runner LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,496

    I'll tell you what happens...more times than not. seeding at this time of year, is fine. No harm done...it stays dormant, and hopefully won't get a warm snap to germinate. If it doesn't germinate...it's safe.
    Sod, on the other hand...is a whole different thing...completely dangerous. The sod lays on top of the ground (even if rolled in). The roots, exposed, freeze up, and the sod suffers from dessication. After these roots are burned, they will NOT pick up in the spring, and be able to transfer. The sod....never takes.
  5. BQLC

    BQLC LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 574

    a lot of the building contractors around here do not use a professonal to lay the sod they use there flunkies and they will put it down regardless of time of year just to have somthing on the lot other than dirt. But the temps around here dod not get that cold for very long so some does take and some doesn't
  6. Total.Lawn.Care

    Total.Lawn.Care LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 841

    Same in my area. Saw a SOD truck turning in to a subdivision this morning.
  7. dcgreenspro

    dcgreenspro LawnSite Senior Member
    from PA
    Posts: 689

    I have seen many of these rules broken. I really can't understand how or why but my old super. that i worked for used to make us lay sod on a course all winter long. Always just throw it down, never prep anything and it always turned out nice. Never lost one bit of it doing that five years. He also like to mow threw frost which, when dealing w/ usga greens and bentgrass, is like playing russian roulette. just remember that sometimes it doesn't have to be by the book.
  8. BSDeality

    BSDeality LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,850

    A major site developer just installed about 2 acres of sod on a wind-swept hill about a month ago here. Town forced him to do it siting erosion problems. It's going to look like a checker board in the spring from all the dead patches.
  9. DBL

    DBL LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,219

    theres been several threads about this so far if you can get ahold of it you can lay it all winter
  10. justgeorge

    justgeorge LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 352

    I installed an irrigation system this past May on a lawn that had been sodded last December. The sod had rooted, I didn't rip anything up with my machine, but you could see pretty much every seam between the rows of sod. By the end of the summer, between a good fertilizer program and of course my irritation system, the lawn looked pretty darn good. Not as good as it could have if the sod had been installed 6 weeks earlier, but not bad.

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