In House Mechanic Pay/Salary

Discussion in 'Mechanic and Repair' started by merrimacmill, Feb 22, 2012.

  1. merrimacmill

    merrimacmill LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 515

    I've had an in house mechanic for quite sometime now, but for one reason or another I am looking at restructuring how things are done to improve consistency, and am considering the hire of a part time mechanic to come in weekly for 10 hours on Friday (since my crews work (4) 10 hour days), or split the time up after hours over several days and repair anything that had been broken over the week. In addition to that guarantee per week, we would give hours on an as needed basis.

    My question to you guys is, how much do you pay your hourly in house mechanic(s), and how do you determine the worth of that employee and they're pay scale? Have you had any issues finding someone (above and beyond the "normal" issues of finding good employees), that is willing to accept a part time, "extra income" type of position?
     
  2. unkownfl

    unkownfl LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,838

    I would say a part time mechanic would be at least $20 an hour if hes any good. Maybe could get a better deal if he works Saturdays or Sundays after his main gig.
     
  3. piston slapper

    piston slapper LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,240

    You're gonna have to give up something.....
    I doubt that you'll find a mechanic to give your business his full attention
    On a part time , rollercoaster schedule. Finding. A good mechanic is a tough call, as you have to be one to know one when you see them.
    Find out what the local shops are paying and go from there.
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  4. merrimacmill

    merrimacmill LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 515

    Unfortunately, I'm aware this isn't the easiest bill to fit. Luckily I don't have an immediate need, but something I'm looking into for the future as I restructure my company. By that I mean that I've been in business for 5 years now and have experienced a lot of "uncontrolled growth", and have lacked in developing air tight systems for my company to run off. My "systems" used to all be in my head, and were relayed to my employees by me verbally telling them. As we all know, after a certain point this stops working so well. At the level I've reached, this is no longer adequate. I've spent the whole winter developing written systems for my company, comprised of hundreds of documents, that cover every aspect of operations, HR, contract management, formalized estimating systems, etc to bring my company to the point of a McDonalds like "machine" that runs from written procedures. Through this process, I've learned a lot about streamlining my operations better, and with that comes the idea of approaching equipment maintenance in a different fashion.
     
  5. piston slapper

    piston slapper LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,240

    If you are outsourcing you major repairs....all you need is somebody with a toolbox and 2 eyes looking in the same direction.
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  6. StihlMechanic

    StihlMechanic LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,133

    I used to do this, but the companies I worked for on the side would bring the equipment to me, at my shop, I NEVER work mobil. I did this while working for various dealerships and I could also get the parts needed so I wasn't dealing with the LCO getting the wrong part, ECT. Of coarse I charged a labor rate, not an hourly wage. It worked out well for both them and I. They still call every year to see if I am still at it.
     
  7. Landrus2

    Landrus2 LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,811

    It's going to be hard to find a good mechanic for $20 an hour :weightlifter
     
  8. Restrorob

    Restrorob LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,024

    It's going to be hard to find a good one period.....



    [​IMG]

    Evidently there's contacts that make cross eyed people look straight eyed, I haven't found one smart enough to even train in 20 yrs and quit advertising atleast 15 yrs ago. I'd rather be a one man show and KNOW my customers are taken care of than to have to worry about a job coming back, I just don't have time to baby sit hacks.....
     
  9. piston slapper

    piston slapper LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,240

    [​IMG]

    Evidently there's contacts that make cross eyed people look straight eyed, I haven't found one smart enough to even train in 20 yrs and quit advertising atleast 15 yrs ago. I'd rather be a one man show and KNOW my customers are taken care of than to have to worry about a job coming back, I just don't have time to baby sit hacks.....[/QUOTE]

    Ditto....RestroRob.....
    I think its time to start asking applicants about their geneology....
    The best hound dog I ever had was born that way....I didnt have to teach him a thing.
    Dale Earnhardt's dad was the iceman of the 50's and 60's...he didnt make mistakes.
    When Dale was asked what he'd be if he wasnt a race car driver....he said he would have been a race car driver.
    My grandfather built the first model T that went over 120 mph....He butted 4 transmissions together,,,,too bad about the steering and brakes....
    My father is a master tech in 3 different fields.....

    There may be something to it.....Ask about their family history.....
     
  10. dutch1

    dutch1 LawnSite Silver Member
    from Jayhawk
    Posts: 2,231

    Rob, you and Slapper have pretty much covered the story.

    I worked in, around or near a decent sized dealership from 97 to 09. During those 12 years, two different owners attempted to hire on no less than 24 techs(by my best guess) who had either been through small engine schools, classes or who had some experience in small engine shops. As I recall, two were gone in less than a week and the longest lasting was probably 4- 6 months. To most, it was not a job, it was the pay check at the end of the week. I don't think you could have combined the work ethic of those 24+ guys into one guy that I could have felt comfortable turning loose in a shop. The number of people who possess a work ethic and take pride in their ability to do a job thoroughly are getting fewer and farther between.

    On the other hand, I guess I'm old school--I started learning those lessons as a farm boy at the age of 9 or 10.
     

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