Injection Pump

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by acolar, Sep 22, 2009.

  1. acolar

    acolar LawnSite Member
    Posts: 9

    Using a rid o rust system - with injection pump on a well based irrigation system.

    Hunter Pro-C controller. Using two PSR's one for the well pump and one for the injection pump.

    I only need to run the injection pump on about three of the 10 zones which are near concrete.

    Trying to save money on rust prevention chemicals.

    Is there an ingenious way anyone has found to activate the injection pump PSR for only three zones.

    Thanks

    Tony
     
  2. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 47,403

    This is a dedicated well? No pressure tank? No pressure switch? If so, there is a way.
     
  3. acolar

    acolar LawnSite Member
    Posts: 9

    Yes,

    the well head is at the main entrance to the sub and is dedicated to irrigation only.

    No pressure switch, no tank, just a PSR activated by the Pro-C.
     
  4. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 47,403

    If it is only three zones, one could obtain three small relays, one for each zone that needs the injection pump running and connect them to the controller. Let the little relays feed the pump-start relay for the injector pump.

    These are the "ice cube" relays with the works enclosed under a clear cover, with a base that generally plugs into a socket, For instance, an Omron MY relay has 5 amp contacts, and has a coil that consumes less than 2 VA ~ about five bucks for the relay, and another five for the socket it plugs into, although you can always solder wires to the lug terminals of the relay, if you wanted to.

    [​IMG]

    For someone who is savvy with electronics, a single relay and some additional components could do the same thing for less cost, but individual tiny relays allow you get this done without too much head-scratching.
     
  5. acolar

    acolar LawnSite Member
    Posts: 9

    so the pro-c has a rating of 24vac @ 0.56 A per station.

    I am not sure how much a current a typical valve draws

    I guess I would attach the Omron relay coil to the controller output for each zone I want the injeciton pump to run and then have the omron relay contact activate the PSR.

    Tony
     
  6. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 47,403

    That's it. The tiny relays are less of a load than a valve solenoid. The actual electronics in the Hunter controllers are rated much higher than the 0.56 Amps they mention, but you have to keep within the bounds of their current limiting, or else the controller thinks there's a short circuit.

    There are tinier relays you could use, but they aren't any cheaper or easier to use.
     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2009
  7. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 47,403

    There are also chassis-mount versions of these relays, with flanges on the clear case, and quick-connect terminals. This type lets you do without sockets and soldering, needing only the matching quick-connector to be crimped onto your wires.

    [​IMG]

    Panasonic HL1-HTM-AC24V-F
     
  8. acolar

    acolar LawnSite Member
    Posts: 9

    The controller can deliver 560 ma per station

    The valves use about 370 ma in rush and 190 ma holding

    The relay coil is 50 ma

    Have you used a scheme with only one relay operated that has its coil operated by three or four different zones. need a logical OR but i guess maybe some diodes to isolate the different controller outputs?

    Any ideas.

    Thanks
     
  9. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 47,403

    The controller can deliver more, believe me. It's just a question when it decides you have a short.

    Sure you can set up something with diodes for using a single relay, but this gets into the Catch 22 of if you have to ask the question, you should steer clear of what you don't thoroughly understand. No insult intended, but if you can't afford thirty bucks worth of relays and enclosure (plastic junction box) and quick-connectors.........

    There are similar relays to the pictured chassis-mount above, for a couple of bucks less, but there might be minimum quantities involved.
     
  10. Mike Leary

    Mike Leary LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 21,916

    I've also used "ice cubes" when I had two clocks sharing the same common.
     

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