In's and out's

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by The Lawn Gator, Jan 14, 2009.

  1. The Lawn Gator

    The Lawn Gator LawnSite Member
    Posts: 37

    I have taken on two large commercial accounts and will be doing large applications for the first time. Where can I learn what products to use, how to use, when etc....

    Do you buy your chemicals online or do you buy locally, i'm a bit limited to who I can buy from locally.

    Do pre emergents fertilize as well as stop weed growth?
     
  2. mattfromNY

    mattfromNY LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,581

    Dont want to rain on your parade, but dont you think you should have known this stuff before bidding the job????
    How did you ever bid a job without knowing what materials/ cost of materials to use????
    I'm at a loss for words.......
     
  3. The Lawn Gator

    The Lawn Gator LawnSite Member
    Posts: 37

    I made my estimates from comparing cost of a smaller account I have. I just used typical ferts and herbs. on that account. Simple spring, summer applications.
     
  4. mattfromNY

    mattfromNY LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,581

    Not trying to be smart, just baffled a little.
    Maybe the laws are different in Oregon than most of the rest of the country, but usually you need to be certified to apply any herbicides/ pesticides, etc. Generally, either through working with someone who is a certified applicator or through training to get your certification, you will learn the basics.
    The questions you ask are very basic, which would lead anyone to believe you are not certified. Maybe you dont need to be in Oregon, I dont know.
    Best to do as much research as possible before spring. Hope you didn't quote for services you are not familiar with. If you've done some fert. in the past and have an idea of your costs/ thousand square feet, etc., you should be alright.
    Snoop around on here a little more, do some searches, there are some VERY knowledgeable guys that are on here a lot and usually very helpful to answer any questions. I am only certified one year, so I am still learning as well.
    Matt.
     
  5. turf hokie

    turf hokie LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,744

    Then go from here. We dont change a our products based on size of the account.:hammerhead:
     
  6. The Lawn Gator

    The Lawn Gator LawnSite Member
    Posts: 37

    You have to be certified to do pesticide applications but not herbicides. I'm going to check in with our local company, Round Butte Seed co. and see what they have to say.

    I think your right on the difference from west coast to east coast. I can't imagine do six applications to any lawn, that's way over doing it not to mention I don't have any customers that would buy off on that. Hell, I always have to persuade them to let me fertilize.

    I wouldn't be able to compete with other competitors if I charge for that much labor and materials.
     
  7. jbturf

    jbturf LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,411

    herbicide is a pesticide
    g/l
     
  8. JDUtah

    JDUtah LawnSite Silver Member
    from UT
    Posts: 2,636

    Yes an herbicide is a pesticide.

    Pesticides kill/control pests. What pests?

    Insecticide ... insects
    Fungicide ... fungi
    Rodenticide ... rodents
    Herbicide ... weeds

    Different kinds of pests. Pesticides are not just for insects... weeds are considered pests too.

    Call your local extension office and get the books to get certified ASAP. It would suck to to be nailed with a $25,000 fine and/or thrown in jail.
     
  9. Ric

    Ric LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,946

    JD

    What license? If Home Depot sells it why can't anyone apply it??? The girl at the cash register will tell me what to use. They can't fine me, I will just tell them I didn't know the law.
     
  10. dishboy

    dishboy LawnSite Platinum Member
    from zone 6
    Posts: 4,115

    In this state you don't need a license if you do not advertise as a applicator, do not use a engine driven pump and are taking care of the rest of the property. Here a Gardner is on equal ground as a homeowner.
     

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