Installing pavers over a deck?

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by geoscaper, Sep 5, 2004.

  1. geoscaper

    geoscaper LawnSite Member
    Posts: 107

    I have a customer that recently purchased a new home. He doesn't like the way his wood deck looks like, but does like the look of brick pavers. He would like me to tear down the railings around the deck and build benchs out of rumble rock, and install pavers over the top of his wood deck. Anybody done a job like this? recomendations, ideas? I have installed pavers, but not over a suface such as this.
     
  2. GrazerZ

    GrazerZ LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 670

    did you ask him if he was serious when he asked? No I havent done a job like this, it is frought with problems. Can the deck hold the weight? how will you keep the pavers from moving? just explain that you can build a nice patio and do it right for him, but you don't think this is a good idea.
     
  3. Rex Mann

    Rex Mann LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 621

    alpine692003 likes this.
  4. geoscaper

    geoscaper LawnSite Member
    Posts: 107

    Rex:

    Thanks for the link to the website, Have you completed a project like this?
     
  5. kris

    kris LawnSite Bronze Member
    from nowhere
    Posts: 1,579

    Link didnt work for me????
     
  6. Rex Mann

    Rex Mann LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 621

  7. kris

    kris LawnSite Bronze Member
    from nowhere
    Posts: 1,579

    Now that is interesting ...thanks
     
  8. Lanelle

    Lanelle LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,361

    I understand the benefit of using pedestal systems on roof decks with the membrane and working to level out the pitch. I just can't imagine our county allowing someone to put concrete paver blocks on top of a wooden deck unless the deck is not elevated. And the rules for railings are very specific.
    Is this wooden deck at ground level?
     
  9. geoscaper

    geoscaper LawnSite Member
    Posts: 107

    The deck is elevated about 3-5 feet. I'm not sure if i'm going to give aproposal or not. I'm going to get an engineer out to the site to look at the deck and see what he thinks. The homeowner seems to be set on brick pavers, but I want to make sure the underpins and timbers are strong enough to support them. Any advice or opinions would be appreciated.
     
  10. D Felix

    D Felix LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,898

    Somehow I doubt that the wieght will be a huge factor. Chances are that if you can walk on the deck, you can lay the pavers. Holland pavers run ~28 pounds per square foot, which isn't a lot of extra wieght. Where the wieght WILL come into play is in a reduction of the amount of LIVE loading the deck is capable of carrying. This means that a deck that could support 50 people at a time, may only be able to carry 30. I'm not an engineer, but I can't see the deck not being able to support the additional wieght. Unless they hold parties on the deck quite frequently, I doubt that would be a problem for most residential applications as long as the deck was built right to begin with. BTW, I'm not saying that the deck in question is capable of holding 50 people, it was just an example....

    What I would be more concerned about is increased aging of the deck materials. Unless the decking is synthetic, the pavers will trap more moisture against the decking, causing it to have a much, much shorter lifespan. Plus, how are you going to level the pavers when individual boards start to cup? How will you address the additional hieght on the deck, which will effectively/significantly reduce the step hieght into the house? How old is the deck? If it's 10 years old, they may only have another 10-15 years left on it. Adding pavers over the top will probaby reduce that by 1/2.... If it was me, I'd either leave it alone, or rip out the deck and do it right to begin with................

    It sounds like a bad idea to me. It threw up red flags with your first post, but not so much because of the wieght issue, as much as the other issues that would be involved.


    Dan
     

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