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Invoice Questions

Discussion in 'Starting a Lawn Care Business' started by shortgrass01, Sep 16, 2006.

  1. shortgrass01

    shortgrass01 LawnSite Member
    from SC
    Posts: 160

    Howday again, Thank you for the helpful advice givin thus far. However I have another question which invloves Invoices.

    What if any *DISCLAIMERS* are used. I partner asked about sprinklers. In My mind I am responable for any accident that my happen. Right. Can I excuse myself for running over a sprinkler that inproperly placed, in long grass?

    Thanks Again
  2. K&A Lawncare

    K&A Lawncare LawnSite Member
    Posts: 38

    I would have the homeowner do a walk through with you through the yard and point out obstacles. That should eliminate most accidents with sprinkler heads and such.
  3. shortgrass01

    shortgrass01 LawnSite Member
    from SC
    Posts: 160

    Aye, I agree, a walk through is basic steps, and should prevent most accidents. So, I take it you use no disclaimers at all on your invoice?

  4. Poncho25

    Poncho25 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 369

    Bottom line is you run a professional business, if you make a mistake and do damage, regardless of what it is or how its placed, you need to fix it. Be it sprinkler heads (which are like 1 - 5 bucks each) to pipes, fence, sod damage anything!
  5. K&A Lawncare

    K&A Lawncare LawnSite Member
    Posts: 38

    I agree if you break it, it is your responsibility to fix it. I also have a clause in my service agreements that states if the customer has an object or area of their yard that might do damage to my equipment or theirs, then I will not maintain that area or object. I also make sure the customer knows what area or object I have concerns about.

    PMLAWN LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,535

    An Invoice only has the billing info in it.
    I believe you are talking about a "Service Agreement" or Contract
    Common wisdom is that if you break it you fix it, BUT,
    You are writing up a legal document and it will state how things will be handed-- There is no way you can cover everything so do not try.
    My contracts stated that --The contractor warrants against any defect in the workmanship of its employees-- This will cover the customer, and yet give you room to negotiate if there is a problem.
    You are a professional giving professional service, with the financial backing of insurance and training, the knowledge to know what to watch out for and the responsively to do the job right. You are providing these services to the uneducated customer that is looking to you for the answer. If you do wrong the law will always side with the customer and your disclaimer will be meaning less. 95% of problems will be easy to deal with on the common since path with the customer and again your disclaimer will not be needed. The other 5% will be bad and courts will not care about it-- so don't bother with any.

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