Irregation problem. Help Please!

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by kdalton, Feb 6, 2008.

  1. kdalton

    kdalton LawnSite Member
    from Arizona
    Posts: 5

    Hello all. This is my first post here, and I really hope that you guys might have some advice for me.

    My problem is this. I work for a Very large retail store in the PHX, AZ metro area. We were originally using city water to irregate the plants (mainly desert bushes and palms) on our huge property. After the construction of a roughly 100,000 gallon pond (for aesthetic purposes) the city switched our irregation to come from this source. Maybe if we were in a different climate this would have worked well, but since 99% of our days here have absolutely no clouds in the sky, we have developed extensive algae growth (both filamentous, and waterbourne) that tends to just clog our drip lines. We have already lost some very expensive palms because of this problem.

    I'm wondering if there are ways counter this problem. Since the water is usually above 95 degrees in the summer, and in the 50's during the winter, it isn't a very hospitable environment for fish. Not to mention that the blue herons will instantly devour any fish that I add.

    Is there a tolerable level of chlorine that the plants can endure, that will kill the algae?

    Any advice is appreciated.

    Thanks!
     
  2. tbettis

    tbettis LawnSite Member
    Posts: 221

    someone chime in on this one...im confused
     
  3. zman9119

    zman9119 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 758

    Calling the Spelling Nazi. Spelling Nazi needed in post 214779.
     
  4. Mike Leary

    Mike Leary LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 22,071

    Not much experience on this....change-out the drip to rotors with big nozzles?
    Ultra violet treatment may help..aerators?;)
     
  5. Flow Control

    Flow Control LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,267

    Sounds like your problem is algae and that it is effecting the irrigation system. Call a pond Doc or post your question in the Pond forum. Any solutions we recommend will not solve the source of the problem.
     
  6. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 48,017

    You have to oxygenate the pond, and keep down the algae. There are plenty of float-mounted fountains or aerators you can use for this purpose.
     
  7. hoskm01

    hoskm01 LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,690

    From what little I know about ponds, I do know that you should be able to get scrubbers and filters that can clean out any algae/sediment that would clog your drip lines. That being said, I dont know what the effect of algae may be on your plants, as you cant get out all the little microbes that live in a pond like that. Additionally, you should be able to hire out some pond maintenance that can control the algae and bring your water to usable quality.

    Where is your building and site, if you dont mind?

    Is your pond filled with reclaimed water?

    Can you just switch your source back to city water?
     
  8. Mike Leary

    Mike Leary LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 22,071

  9. hoskm01

    hoskm01 LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,690

    Rotors on palm trees? Waste waste waste.
     
  10. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 48,017

    Otterbines are okay, although there were a few flaws in one I assembled and installed for a customer. (You want to add a poly-pipe {or similar} shield for the power cord where it nears the pump, and can rub against the screening)
     

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