Irrigated Vegetable Bed Blog

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by jeffinsgf, Mar 18, 2008.

  1. jeffinsgf

    jeffinsgf LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 641

    Thanks to all of you guys here who bounced ideas around with me a few weeks ago concerning the best choices for watering some raised bed garden boxes. I settled on RainBird XPCN nozzles on 4" risers, and couldn't be happier with them. Like the RB propaganda says, they spray in a nearly perfect square. It's pretty remarkable to watch. The pressure compensation works as advertised, too. They spray just about exactly 4 feet left and right and 5'-8" diagonally. I did not fully appreciate another feature of the XPCN until I fired them up. They have two settings for the arc. One sprays up and reaches the maximum rating (4 feet). The other directs the spray much flatter and reduces the overall arc by a bit (around 3 feet). This will be perfect for those plants which prefer to not have their foliage wet.

    I have started a blog on my raised bed gardening project: Jeff's Garden Blog The first entry shows the boxes after I set and leveled them and the plumbing for the irrigation. I know there are at least a couple of Mac-addicts running around here. FYI, I used iWeb to produce the blog pages, and it worked like a champ.
     
  2. They are a great nozzle. I'm going to use them in my garden as well. I finished my beds. (Well the kid down the street did for 50 bucks) I'll post pics and strategies as well.
     
  3. Mike Leary

    Mike Leary LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 22,068

     
  4. DanaMac

    DanaMac LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,156

    Cool beans... heh heh. Get it? Beans? vegetable garden? oh nevermind...... ;)
     
  5. Mike Leary

    Mike Leary LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 22,068

    Go ahead, hi jack this very serious technical thread. :eek:
     
  6. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,308

    I thought you were putting in a garden? Not to discourage you, but you might want to know your only going to get about 10 years out of posts before they rot.
     
  7. jeffinsgf

    jeffinsgf LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 641

    You? Discourage anyone Kiril? You've got to be kidding! :waving:

    They were free. If I get 10 years out of them I'll be thrilled.

    That said, there are Eastern cedar (juniper) fence posts all over this part of the country that are over 20 years old.
     
  8. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,308

    Juniper will last longer. The look like the cheap redwood they sell out here.

    So why the boxes?
     
  9. jeffinsgf

    jeffinsgf LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 641

    Our soil is rocks held together with clay. I was going to have to do a huge amount of amendment for a traditional garden, so I decided that raised beds would be just as easy. Also, my 50 year old knees and back prefer bringing the work up a little closer. Finally, I have already designed fence panels that I am going to make for the boxes to keep the deer and raccoons out of the produce. That seemed easier with the beds than with a traditional layout.

    My goal is to see just how much quality produce I can grow from April to November in 64 square feet. Intensive raised bed gardening allows you to plant more plants in less space than a traditional garden. I have been studying companion planting and examining early, mid and late season crops to plan out the plant mix and rotation for each bed throughout the growing season.

    And if Nancy and I get bored with it all by July, I'll fill them with petunias. :drinkup:
     
  10. jeffinsgf

    jeffinsgf LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 641

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