irrigation addition

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by bjlawnman, Nov 24, 2005.

  1. bjlawnman

    bjlawnman LawnSite Member
    Posts: 135

    Next spring i am going to be finishing off my sprinkler system. We moved into and existing home with a yard and found out when they put in the yard they didnt have enough money to put in the whole sprinkler system so they did only half of the yard. my question is I found the main-line and i was wondering is all I have to do is put a T in it and then bring the main line to the other part of the yard where the valve box is going to be?
    any help or input would be greatly appreciated
    thank a lot
    bj
     
  2. Dirty Water

    Dirty Water LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,794

  3. PurpHaze

    PurpHaze LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,496

    Basically that's all you have to do in order to add a valve(s) onto an existing main line. If it's an automatic system then you will also need to have the wiring extended to wherever you decide to place the new valve(s). Depending on how your site looks you could also get away with installing the new valve(s) right at the existing main line and then carrying the lateral lines to the area to be watered.

    You note that I indicate valve(s) above. Without designing out the new area, knowing what size main line you have, what the pressure is and what type of sprinklers (including nozzles) will determine if you can water the new area with only one valve or not.
     
  4. sprinklerhead

    sprinklerhead LawnSite Member
    from MI.
    Posts: 92

    You could also use an existing sprinkler line if you feel like capping off sprinkler heads, if you dont want to run into any existing lines while trenching. Just remove the diaphram out of the valve you want to cap off find the end and coupling onto there!and install your manifold/valves pull lines from there!
     
  5. Dirty Water

    Dirty Water LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,794

    That only works if the original installer ran a decent sized sprinkler line the whole way.

    I'm somewhat oldschool, so my sprinkler lines start at mainline size, and by the last head are 3/4".
     
  6. PurpHaze

    PurpHaze LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,496

    I think I'm following your train of thought but I can't agree. If this is a viable valve and zone why would you want to basically abandon this zone and turn the main lateral into the main line? You're still going to need to run wiring to the new valve(s) and you'll incur some PSI loss through the abandoned valve. You'll also lose the existing zone.

    Depending on how the existing zone is configured and how many sprinklers it will take to cover the new area there is always the possibility of extending the existing zone. But that will depend on a lot of "ifs" and is not for the feint of heart.
     
  7. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 48,041

    Every now and then, you can expand a system by 'stealing' a zone line, or even two zone lines, using one of them as a sleeve to carry wire. I remember one addition done that way, when the original system had three zones crossing under some pavers that were best left undisturbed, so a new valve box was located in the lawn area, instead of near the house.
     
  8. PurpHaze

    PurpHaze LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,496

    Only time I've done this is on a baseball field where we were totally re-doing two zones between the field and the street. They had two old valves in a concrete area next to one of the dugouts that was a jumble of galvanized pipes prone to leaking. Took our jackhammer and busted everything out and dug up the area. Cut out the leaking areas of galvanized pipe, re-threaded it and started a new PVC main line off it. I used one of the 1-1/2" PVC laterals (went under 10' of concrete) to continue the main and one for the wire. Was able to set a QCV for washing off the bleachers and then set two new valves in the grass. Area looks great now with grass and trees for spectators. They did lose a hose bibb that came off the old main in the concrete area but gained the QCV.
     
  9. PurpHaze

    PurpHaze LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,496

    Boots... Didn't want you to think this was a totally bad idea. Just that all the ramifications have to be taken into account. Someone not knowing what they're doing can destroy one zone to build another if they're not careful.
     
  10. sprinklerhead

    sprinklerhead LawnSite Member
    from MI.
    Posts: 92

    It doesn't kill the psi that much to hurt the system, when we do that we use the automated controlled hunter valves each valve solenoid has a timer that operates like the hunter src contorller it works great! no wires needed ,we did this in a couple areas were they had a very large built in pool and we didn't want to take the chance of hitting the pool lines from the underground filter and gas heater. worked great didnt notice a pressure drop. the main 1" tested @50 psi were we connected the new manifolds. We ran 6 zones from there.
     

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