Irrigation Classes?

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by drsogr, Mar 19, 2005.

  1. drsogr

    drsogr LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,275

    I spend a lot of time installing new yards. Rather for sod or seed. Most of my yards have a sprinkler system, yet I do not know much about sprinklers. I am starting to get a hands on knowledge from the yards I have done, but I feel I need a more complete knowledge. I have no desire to put in sprinkler heads for a living, as I have enough on my plate on the moment. I just want to know how to adjust them, and maybe replace them. Does rainbird or anyone have a general knowledge type class?

    Thanks,
    Derek
     
  2. kerdog

    kerdog LawnSite Member
    Posts: 129

    Hey Derek-----


    Check with your state to find out whether or not one needs to be licensed to do irrigation work, first. If so, then the classes, courses required would give you the education you would need. If licensing is not required, then you might look at trying to find a class to take at a community college, etc. Could call and talk to an irrigation supplier for some help, about this. Sometimes they hold small seminars at their place, introducing new products, etc. There is also a national irrigation association that offers classes and certification. It's irrigation.org on the web. There is a lot to know about systems, but for some basic maintence, like your describing, a good supplier should be able to help you out, on a case by case situation. And you can always ask here, for specific help or advice about a particular problem.

    See ya----
     
  3. drsogr

    drsogr LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,275

    Thanks for the info. I just like making my customer thing, that I know everything. I hate getting stumped on the jobsite.
     
  4. greenworldh20

    greenworldh20 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 659

    contact the ia...they have great classes available...or contact a local supplier...they offer classes...though sometimes they are geared as 'sales' classes.

    brian
     
  5. ECS

    ECS LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,733

    Very easy to replace and adjust. Just go ask the supplier you will be getting them from and they can show you in a couple of minutes.
     
  6. trying 2b organic

    trying 2b organic LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 566

    Good thread, I am a lawnguy just here to try to learn the very basics also. Apparanly our main supplier is one of those "contractor only" attitude places and if you ask questions you get dumb looks. I finally found a friend who works for a landscaping company who will come out after work and help me learn what I have to for my commercial props.
    Start up, set timer, replace heads i mow, blow outs. ty guys for your willingness to help the lawn guys get by.

    edit. ok, if I dont get teased off for this one u guys are for real. And no its not my first day just have avoided learning about irrigation. When I clean out and or replace a spray head does the irrigation have to be on so its popped up or can i just pry it up? ty
     
  7. drsogr

    drsogr LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,275

    I have a freind that offered to do irrigation with me. He is a plumber, but knows how to do irrigation. He does everything the long way though, not very productive. Likes the ol' shovel method.
     
  8. jerryrwm

    jerryrwm LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,274

    [QUOTE ] .

    edit. ok, if I dont get teased off for this one u guys are for real. And no its not my first day just have avoided learning about irrigation. When I clean out and or replace a spray head does the irrigation have to be on so its popped up or can i just pry it up? ty[/QUOTE]


    To clean it out properly it is best to have it operate at least once after you service the head. Or if you are extrermely careful and get absolutely no debris in the head or riser, you can roll the dice and hope it works. Takes just a couple minutes to turn on the zone and check it. Beats getting the call a couple days later saying that the head you replaced doesn't work.

    Jerry R
    TLI #1452
     
  9. trying 2b organic

    trying 2b organic LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 566

    I think my question is so dumb u didnt understand it. My helper knows just enough to be dangerous, when he wants to clean out or adjust or even replace a nozzle. (not a rotor, the small spray pop-ups) he always does it witht he water ON. Getting very wet in the process, I assume he does so cause the head is already poped up. Is that the way to do it? ty
     
  10. kerdog

    kerdog LawnSite Member
    Posts: 129

    To "trying 2b organic"-------

    The system does not have to be on to change a nozzle. You can pull the stem up by the lip on the nozzle, grip the stem, and unscrew/screw the nozzle. New heads (at least Hunter/Rainbird) come with a plastic "flush cap", installed, so you can flush out any dirt or small debris after installation, before you put the nozzle on. If you could get your hands on a couple of those, (after they are used, they usually get thrown away) it might help you in the future, with clogged heads. The flush caps have a small enough opening, to allow the zone to pressurize, but large enough to let dirt, etc. get out.

    The final adjustment of the nozzle, if needed....well, you're probably going to have to get a little wet! See ya------
     

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