Irrigation system fed from a river

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by ple_1969, Sep 3, 2011.

  1. ple_1969

    ple_1969 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 204

    I’m a homeowner designing an irrigation system from a river. I am knowledgeable in the process of designs and installing systems (worked for an installer during my younger days). All systems we installed used city water to supply the system.

    I have access and rights (approved by the DEP) to use less then 100 GPM from a river in my yard. However I’ll only use about 30 GPM. I have all the calculations needed for PSI loss, pipe sizing, pump sizing etc.

    My question is what type of head would be the best way to go. I will install a filter on the main line (VU-Flow 30 or 60 mesh). My original thought was to use a Hunter I-20 or Rainbird 5000 but with all the research I’ve done on this site not sure if the Maxi-paw would be a better choice for river water. What makes me nervous are the negative responses to the Maxi-paw.

    Not sure if this will help, but I will use a Goulds submersible pump (25GS20) with a 2 hp motor. The pump will be in a PVC well screen and rest on cinderblocks a few inched off the river bottom.

    I’m grateful for any feedback I can get (negative to positive).

    Pete
     
  2. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 47,009

    As a DIY guy, there won't be any issues with the Maxipaws you can't handle. They are a great choice for dirty water. Rainbird PESB scrubber valves will handle such water.

    Make sure you have a pressure relief valve in your plumbing, since that pump can go beyond 130 psi
     
  3. ple_1969

    ple_1969 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 204

    wet boots - thanks for the reply and the heads up with the pressure relief valve. The pump/irrigation shop I'm working with did not mention that high of PSI.

    About the valve, I'll look into the rainbirds and do some research (don't know too much about them. However what are your thoughts on the Irritrol 700?

    Pete
     
  4. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 47,009

    If you get the PESB valves and Maxipaw heads, you won't have to filter the water so fine.

    Pressure is one reason I favor the use of jet pumps for a system I install using poly pipe, since those pumps don't develop enough pressure to cause damage. That it is also an above-ground pump eliminates the problem of putting power wires into an accessible body of water, especially one you don't own. The Goulds pump I would have chosen is their J15S, with 25 gpm of useful flow, if it doesn't have to lift the water too much. In fact, with a 5-foot lift, and running Maxipaw heads, you can get almost as much water with the 1 HP J10S
     
  5. ple_1969

    ple_1969 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 204

    Wet Boots - don't think I can use that pump. The dealer and I looked at many pumps that will draw up water, however I have a 25' rise to the bank of the river and another 15' elevation change to my house. 25' is at the max those pumps can handle. With the output needed of 25 - 30 GPM and a working pressure of 65 PSI the dealer suggested the 25GS20.

    Rotor question, is there any gear rotors that would hold up to the dirty water? If I go with the Maxi-paw what are some of the common issues that is has?

    Pete
     
  6. Mike Leary

    Mike Leary LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 21,799

    In my travels, I've never seen rotors pumping from a river. However, depending on the turbidity, you could zone the hell out of the system and use the largest nozzles. Sand and gear-drives are not good friends, though. Weather-Matic makes a good "scrubber valve" you might look into. :)
     
  7. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 47,009

    Are you clear about having approval to place a pump in the river? I don't take that as a given, not in New Jersey. (and if you tick off the powers that be, the DEP could pull the river-water permit)

    Completely off the beaten path, but possible when you border a river with good flow, is a Ram Pump, which uses the force of the moving river water to pump it uphill to your location. No elevation worries with those, and no electricity used, and no issues with power wires. Once the water reaches an uphill holding tank, a jet pump can take over.

    What size is the property? How much area is being watered?
     
  8. ple_1969

    ple_1969 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 204

    I'll touch base with Trenton after the weekend just to make sure. I'm not sure I'll have the current needed for the ram pump. Here are some pictures of the elevation change.

    hill.jpg

    hill2.jpg

    hill3.jpg
     
  9. Mike Leary

    Mike Leary LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 21,799

    Looks like pretty clear water. :clapping:
     
  10. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 47,009

    I take it the river can rise that 17-20 feet? In the absence of a pump in the river (including a ram pump, which won't work there) you could place a jet pump as close to water level as you dare. If an equivalent to a hinged floating dock could be devised, it would be possible to have a pump that stays a few feet above river level, giving you maximum performance.

    How many acres of lawn are you watering?
     

Share This Page