Is it okay to increase the wattage?

Discussion in 'Landscape Lighting' started by MarkSJames, Jul 19, 2006.

  1. MarkSJames

    MarkSJames LawnSite Member
    Posts: 2

    I would like to increase the wattage of the bulbs used in my landscape lighting but was wondering if there are any risks or danger from doing so. Most of my fixtures are rated for either 7 watts or 11 watts and I would like to increase them at least one level each, so for example going from 7 watts to 11 watts and 11 watts to 18 watts.

    My transformer has plenty of power to handle the increase in bulb wattage along the tracks, but will increaseing the wattage cause any issues, risks or dangers?

    I appreciate any help you can provide me on this matter.

    Regards,

    Mark
     
  2. NightScenes

    NightScenes LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,209

    Do not exceed the max wattage indicated on your fixtures. These fixures should be UL listed with a max wattage label on it. The biggest problem with increasing the wattage is that it will burn up the socket.
     
  3. desert night light

    desert night light LawnSite Member
    from AZ
    Posts: 215

    ditch the wedge malibu lights and get yourself some real lights that take bi-pin bulbs. that's the best advice we can give. now go read gambino's new magazine article . he'll teach ya.
     
  4. JimLewis

    JimLewis LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,842

    Ditto what Dessert Light said. You won't find 7w or 11w bulbs on professional lighting fixtures. Ditch Malibu and start installing some real lighting.

    Most professional grade fixtures start at 20w. Many are 35w or 40w. And some are even larger.

    In addition to the mag. article mentioned, I'd also personally recommend Nate Mullen's book, "Trade Secrets of Professional Landscape Lighting".
     
  5. NightScenes

    NightScenes LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,209

    Most professional deck lights are only 6.5 - 10 watts.
     
  6. MarkSJames

    MarkSJames LawnSite Member
    Posts: 2

    Thanks for all the good information. I have read over many of Gambino's articles and will check out Nate Mullen's book, "Trade Secrets of Professional Landscape Lighting". I have managed to get better light output by splitting the existing landscape lighting zones from the original 2 zones to 4. With this split I have additional capacity to upgrade to some higher end professional light fixtures.
     
  7. Pro-Scapes

    Pro-Scapes LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,181

    make sure your main lines are up to it before adding wattage as well. Alot of the low end homeowner "kits" come with 16ga wire. Lots of loss there and low capacity
     
  8. JimLewis

    JimLewis LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,842

    Most are 10w. I don't know any major professional brands (e.g. FX Luminare, Unique, Vista, etc.) that have less than a 10w deck light. Vista has one that is 20w and that's the one I use.
     
  9. desert night light

    desert night light LawnSite Member
    from AZ
    Posts: 215

    You are so right Jim Lewis (I usually don't trust people with two first names, but you sound like a good guy) , don't listen to that other guy who thinks he knows it all and gets all bent out of shape once Gambino's name is mentioned in a thread. I at least admit it that Gambino blows my work off the map. This other guy, with his dinky point and shoot camera, is so delusional that he thinks his work is on par with Gambino's . Absolutely Incredible.
     
  10. Pro-Scapes

    Pro-Scapes LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,181

    we just put in some SPJ's that were 20w as well. They ended up spaced pretty good. If We went closer would of prolly swapped out for a lower wattage.
     

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