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Is it too late to grow grass this spring?

Discussion in 'Turf Renovation' started by snuddenstang, Jun 9, 2009.

  1. snuddenstang

    snuddenstang LawnSite Member
    from nj
    Posts: 56

    I am in north Jersey. I graded my backyard around 15000 sq ft. I put down Scotts Sun and Shade with Thermal Blue along with Scotts starter fert with crabgrass preventer. I just loosened up the top 2 inches on the top soil that I put down and back racked the seed and fert in. No other topdressing. I did this 3 1/2 weeks ago, the lawn is very spotty and still is not long enough for the first cut. I have set up 7 sprinklers around the yard and water in the morning and the evening. I overseeded again 8 days ago then rolled that seed lightly. I did not work the seed in though as I did not want to kill the new grass that was growing from the first round of seed. At this point the lawn is ok in some areas but for the most part it is spotty and bare in many areas. Is there anything I can do to get a decent lawn in this summer and? I will attempt to slice seed in the fall also. I suspect the starter fert with the crabgrass preventer may have halted some see germination along with a few very hot days that may have killed some seed. Is it worth trying to overseed again? I am afraid if I keep watering at night to get the new seed to germinate will cause some type of disease to the new grass.
     
  2. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,081

    Ya think!!! :laugh:
     
  3. newtostone

    newtostone LawnSite Senior Member
    from NY
    Posts: 681

    I think you have the right idea. I would just let it be for the summer, Come mid September slit seed it in two different directions and use starter fert and you'll be gold. Come spring youll have a perfect lawn and moving on.
     
  4. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,081

    If you are going to let it go for this summer then be sure to keep everything killed as it germinates. Either by tilling, roundup or "Crabgrass Preventer" , but the bottom line is - Nothing grows this fall , except your seed...
     
  5. Turboguy

    Turboguy LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,959

    What small ax was saying is that the crab grass preventer was probably your problem. Crab grass is an annual weed. The way most people get rid of it is a crab grass preventer which keeps the crab grass seed from germinating. One of the side problems with it is that it will also inhibit the germination of grass seed. I would suggest just putting up with it for now and dealing with it in the fall.
     
  6. snuddenstang

    snuddenstang LawnSite Member
    from nj
    Posts: 56

    why do they sell starter fert with crabgrass preventer in it if it affects the germination of the grass seed? The bag says it is specifically made for new seed and preventing crabgrass also.
     
  7. Rtom45

    Rtom45 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 456

    This has been a tough year for seed germination in our area. Some very warm days and some record setting low temperatures at other times. And the month of May was pretty dry here also. Part of the problem you're having with germination, even with the overseeding is the residual effect of the crabgrass control. You can weaken that barrier by raking with a hard rake, several times. You can still reseed this year if you're not patient enough to wait til fall (I'm one of those kind of people). You'll just have to be careful with your watering - constant damp soil for the seed, but not so wet that you have mud. And no weed control of any kind. If you haven't fertilized since the first time, you can use some starter fertilizer.
     
  8. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,081

    They probably plan for you to put the fert. down after the grass comes up. Or they believe that it forms an invisible barrier than doesn't affect grass seed if you plant after, by scratching in the seed and topdressing.

    Or maybe it is Sideron, Tupersan that is in the mix, is actually does not affect grass seed germination, supposedly... but it is the only one that does not affect CG and turf grasses equally.

    Topdressing with compost is the best starter fertilizer in the world. Water is what young seedlings need more than anything, and unless your soil is awfully infertile you should avoid N in particular.

    Young plants establish root systems more than anything, forcing green growth with N is foolish at this point. It is a radical idea, but makes perfect sense... :)
     
  9. bigslick7878

    bigslick7878 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 809

    Scotts starter with crabgrass control does not affect new seed.

    Pics or it didn't happen.
     
  10. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,081

    What is the AI, and how does it work?
    The mythology grows.

    The invisible barrier only lets through the things we want. :laugh:
     

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