Is Moly grease the right kind?

Discussion in 'Mechanic and Repair' started by Lynden-Jeff, Aug 7, 2006.

  1. Lynden-Jeff

    Lynden-Jeff LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,405

    Hey,

    I am just about to grease all the points on my bobcat for the first time. I bought an Extreme Moly grease. Its black if they makes a difference. Is this ok for most grease points? I do not have greaseable spindels. Also ive read that you should not mix certain types of grease. I don't know what grease my dealer uses but it looks red and may be made by LUCAS.

    Cheers
    Jeff
     
  2. Kartracer55

    Kartracer55 LawnSite Member
    from NJ
    Posts: 22

    For the record, "Moly Grease" is grease with Molybdenum DiSulfide added to it. This is becoming a very common thing. What we dont know is what the BASE of the grease is. IIRC, MoS2 as well as graphite are just additives to grease for metal/metal contact in high heat/stress applications where the rest of the grease may begin to break down. Im not a chemical engineer so I cant give you much more on that. The base of a grease is where you run into problems with mixing different types. Youve probably heard of Lithium based grease, but theres also Sodium Grease and Polyeurea grease, as well as many others I cant begin to explain about. Some bases are compatable others are not. If you're REALLY concerned I would call up the shop that last greased the machine and find out the brand and type of grease they use(d), although It was most likely a regular old Lithium based NLGI 2 chassis/wheel bearing grease. As long as the thickness and Base is the same dont worry. Hell, just think about how many guys dont even wonder about what you just ask and use whatever they grab first?

    As for mixing greases, this is true to an extent. The brand doesnt really matter as long as the TYPE of grease is the same. For automotive wheel bearings and other high stress/risk deals stick to one brand of grease but nothing on a mower is going to be THAT critical, ya know?

    Look on the container/cartridge and look for two things... the NLGI number and the Base of the grease and post them up. Then call the shop and ask what brand/type of grease they normally use and well help you from there

    Jim
     
  3. Lynden-Jeff

    Lynden-Jeff LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,405

    Hey,

    Well I loaded the gun so ill have to go to a canadian tire and take a look at the tube. I know its motomaster but I don't know either of the questions you asked. Technically you arnt supposed to mix lithium and Molybdenum greases correct? Ill see what I can find out when I go back to the store.

    Cheers
    Jeff
     
  4. Kartracer55

    Kartracer55 LawnSite Member
    from NJ
    Posts: 22

    Lithium is a Base, im pretty sure Moly is an additive to the grease, irrelevant of the base. Ok, heres my midnight thinking coming out...

    think of it like bread...

    Different breads use different flours as a base...white bread uses regular old white flour. Wheat and whole grains use wheat flower. But the sugar and yeast and everything else is still going to be the same. Think of Moly as raisins or whatever else they might add to bread. Know what I mean? Its just something extra
     
  5. Lynden-Jeff

    Lynden-Jeff LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,405

    OK I get that. So what types of bases are non compatible? Ive read so far lithium, sulpher and aluminum bases I think? What happens if there is a bit of grease and I add a pump or two of this new stuff to the zerks?

    Cheers
    Jeff
     
  6. Kartracer55

    Kartracer55 LawnSite Member
    from NJ
    Posts: 22

    Your looking for a grease compatability chart...

    http://www.finalube.com/reference_material/grease_compatibility_chart.htm

    If you mix incompatable grease, the lubricative (did I make that word up?) properties of the grease will be negativly affected, which is why they are incompatable. They might break down with temperature, thin out, thicken, who knows. Also, if you mix NLGI numbers you will thin out or thicken the grease which can also negativly affect it. It all depends on what your mixing.

    For most stuff just a NLGI 2 chassis/wheel bearing grease will probably work just fine.
     
  7. Lynden-Jeff

    Lynden-Jeff LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,405

    OK thanks for the info. If I did mix 2 incompatible greases do you think that it would be enough to cause failer of that joint?

    Cheers
    Jeff
     
  8. Kartracer55

    Kartracer55 LawnSite Member
    from NJ
    Posts: 22

    What exactly are you looking to grease? Also, if its possible to remove a dust cover or shield or something of that nature, could you possibly flush out the old grease with brake cleaner and just repack it all?

    That is common for wheel bearings on autos... if your not going to replace them and you want to just repack them manufacturers recommend that you clean the bearings with brake cleaner and then repack in new grease if you are unsure of the type originally used.


    But to be completely honest, Not too many guys even bother asking what you are asking now. Too many simply have no idea and all of thier equipment is still running. Ive got 1$ that says they were using regular old lithium based chassis grease. Its cheap and its common. But still, give them a call and ask. Dont take my word for it, im just a stranger on the internet haha

    Jim
     
  9. Lynden-Jeff

    Lynden-Jeff LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,405


    Ha I know man but I asked for opinions. You seem to make sense. I called and they said they just use the cheapest wheel bearing grease and he said any of the cheaper ones will do. Its for all the lube points on a rider and a Wb, no spindles though. I really am not worried im just going to use what I got. It only takes a pump or 2 to fill these points correct?

    Cheers
    Jeff
     
  10. Kartracer55

    Kartracer55 LawnSite Member
    from NJ
    Posts: 22

    Never done it before.

    But I did stay at a Holiday in Express last night.

    :rolleyes:

    Everything I say is from an Automotive standpoint... probably should have included that. Now for greasing things, it depends on what your greasing. All these grease guns advertise 3000psi of pressure and stuff like that... thats all fine and dandy but you gotta remember it takes a hell of alot less than that to blow out a seal. The key thing to remember when greasing is slowly... if you feel resistance then its probably full, dont pump anymore.

    Like I said I dont know what, speficially, your greasing here. I dont work on big commercial machines, youll have to ask somebody else that knows about your specific machine, maybe call the place back up and see what they say.

    Jim
     

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