Is this Grapple Bucket worth it?

Discussion in 'Heavy Equipment & Pavement' started by thepawnshop, Oct 29, 2004.

  1. thepawnshop

    thepawnshop LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 387

    I found this grapple bucket online, and it is about 1k more expensive than any of the others I have found and I was wondering if any of you pros out there can tell me after looking at it if it is worth the extra $$$$$$.


    "The ANB Grapple"

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Also, if this isn't posted in the right place, please tell me which forum to post questions regarding attachments.

    Thanks!
     
  2. Tigerotor77W

    Tigerotor77W LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Germany
    Posts: 1,891

    It'll take a pretty good bite out of your loader's ROC. It looks extremely strong, however, and if you plan to do work that involves abrasive materials (demolition, scrap handling, forestry work) then it's likely a good bet. However, if you are planning on using it just to clean up home sites, it might be excessive and even useless because there is no solid floor.
     
  3. thepawnshop

    thepawnshop LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 387

    With the weight kit (which I am getting), the ROC of the JD 320 is 2450#. My main use would be for moving rocks, busted up curbs, uprooting brush, etc.

    I have considered the one with the bucket below, but this monster looks like it could do some damage!
     
  4. Tigerotor77W

    Tigerotor77W LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Germany
    Posts: 1,891

    Okay. As long as you don't try to move rocks that are too small you'll be okay. I would think of this tool more as an uprooter or a fork than a bucket. I'm not sure if rental yards would have it -- but I do suggest trying it out. You'll get pretty far with curbs and rocks (and definitely brush), but I'm not sure how much you'll want to switch to a regular bucket to get all the small stuff.
     
  5. UNISCAPER

    UNISCAPER LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,426

    What is it you will be grabbing? We have one we use out in the burn zones and for demolition and it is a time saver for sure. I picked up an torched chevy 4x4 frame, after the body and engine had melted to the ground duiring the blaze. Grabbed the whole thing ans tossed it in a recycle bin no problems.
     
  6. EngDave

    EngDave LawnSite Member
    from GA
    Posts: 19

    Hmmmm.....as with every thing there are pros and cons.
    Pro - I've done business with skidsteersolutions and found them to be honest and accurate about the workmanship and capabilities of their equipment. I'm a satisfied customer. This is a root rake style grapple with a huge opening.
    Con - Is this the correct design for your use, no bottom horizontal tine. This thing doesn't look cheap!
    I guess if you were picking up really big objects this style grapple would be helpful. However, based on your intended use, I think an "L" shaped grapple with a horizontal bottom tine might be more suitable. The bottom tine helps the hydraulics hold the load in the grapple particularly if you have odd shaped material.
    I use my grapple every week and found that the bottom tine is mandatory for my use. I use it to clear sites of loose debris, stumps, logs, brush, construction material, etc. Many times I've stacked 2x material on the bottom tine and lightly secured it with the grapple to transport over rough terrain. I haven't found it suitable for raking or digging probably because my soil is too hard and/or my SSL doesn't have enough push.
    I found my grapple at an equipment auction for $800 w/o hoses and couplers. All in about $1000. It's weight does take a big bite out of the operating capacity but it definitely does the job. Definitely one of my most used attachments.
    Dave
     
  7. thepawnshop

    thepawnshop LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 387

    Dave, is there any way you could post either a photo of your grapple, or of one similar? John Deere has one similar to this one, but it has two "two-tooth" hydraulic prongs on top. Here is a photo:

    [​IMG]

    Or is it more useful if it had the bucket in the bottom like so:

    [​IMG]

    Thanks!
     
  8. EngDave

    EngDave LawnSite Member
    from GA
    Posts: 19

    Doug - I'm having trouble attaching photos of my grapple to this post. I'm doing something wrong, just don't know what! Let me know and I'll try and re-send. I can e-mail them to you if you send me your e-mail address if that's more convenient. Anyhow, my grapple looks like the top photo in your post. As far as the bucket style grapple is concerned, it's not for me. My guess is it would be used on concrete slabs or other improved surfaces where the likelyhood of picking up unwanted material is unlikely, say a recycling center for instance. When I tried picking up debris in my GP bucket I always ended up with more dirt than I wanted or I chased stuff around a lot. With the grapple, I just pick stuff up and shake off the dirt.
    Here are a couple of websites with similar designed grapples, www.loflinfabrication.com and www.solesbeesequipment.com. I probably would have bought one from Solesbee's had I not found mine at auction.
    Dave
     
  9. thepawnshop

    thepawnshop LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 387

  10. ksss

    ksss LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 7,129

    I have two grapple buckets one for the larger 95xt and second for the smaller 70xt. These grapples are similar to the smaller pictures shown above. The buckets have two separate grapples that operate independent of each other. That makes them perfect for loading concrete. They are invaluable for me. The picture shown is actually used for grubbing and perhaps specialized demolition. The more typical closed bottom with independant grapples will be useful for your described intent. You can see a photo of our grapple while doing an interior demolition of a school. The grapple is on an 1840 on the second floor dumping out a window. The website is kaiserskidsteer.com
     

Share This Page