Japanese beetle grubs

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by Yatt, May 9, 2013.

  1. Yatt

    Yatt LawnSite Member
    Posts: 157

    All the damage is from last year.

    This japanese beetle thing around here is new. In the past I have never seen any issues. Last year I was beginning to see some damage on my apple trees of my orchard and they are on an IPM of every 14 days minimum spray schedule and they get a shot of Imidan every time.

    Virtually all the golf courses are now treating for grubs.

    Getting back to my original question:

    How is everyone treating, a fetilizer based insecticide such as Merit, a granular product just for grubs or an additive that can be used with broad leaf control at the same time.

    I kind of prefer the latter as I don't want to charge people for more applications than necessary and if I could do two things at once it would be great.
     
  2. walliemeisner

    walliemeisner LawnSite Member
    Posts: 8

    Mole activity, as you mentioned would indicate grubs. I'm not an expert, but I've been told by experts (not sales reps (c;) that moles/voles are there for the grubs. The treatment for moles on golf courses is to spray for grubs.
     
  3. Efficiency

    Efficiency LawnSite Bronze Member
    from zone 6
    Posts: 1,536

    Not true in any way
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  4. Efficiency

    Efficiency LawnSite Bronze Member
    from zone 6
    Posts: 1,536

    OP, we spray ours
    Posted via Mobile Device
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  5. hackitdown

    hackitdown LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,490

    Mole activity in our area often indicates grubs. Skunks or crows and robins tearing up the turf, is also a hint. Neither is proof, but they would trigger a real inspection.

    We use Merit early summer as a preventive measure around here. For lawn with heavy populations of actively feeding grubs, we apply Dylox.
     
  6. Yatt

    Yatt LawnSite Member
    Posts: 157

    Well I have heard that to, but this is how it was explained to me. Moles are out for food. Grubs are like lobster/shrimp and earthworms and nightcrawlers are like cheeseburgers. Sure they like the grubs, but won't turn down the worms too. Moles make the runs they do, then cruise the runs for whatever comes in.
     
  7. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,080

    It is usually helpful to print out the relevant paragraph, in determining the correct response to the OP...

    "... Am I using the correct approach? Timing is a critical consideration when using a preventive approach for white grub control. Neonicotinoid insecticides have little or no effect against the large, mature grubs that are present in the spring or the fall. The appropriate preventive use pattern is to time the application so that the material is in place when the grubs are in the most susceptible stage of development, which is immediately after egg hatch. The life cycles of the various grub species found in New England are relatively similar: adults fly in early summer and lay eggs in late June to late July; larvae feed on turf roots from early July through mid-autumn and again in the spring; pupae are present in the soil for a week in mid-June to mid-July; and adults emerge early the following summer to complete the cycle. Neonicotinoids for grub control, therefore, must only be applied within the period from approximately mid-June to early August in most years. Applications at other times will be markedly less effective against grubs, while still carrying the potential to affect non-target insects like bees. ..."

    At this point it becomes clear that the OP needs to understand the estimated time of egg hatch in his area,,, if indeed we are to continue as knowledgeable professionals... :)
     
  8. Yatt

    Yatt LawnSite Member
    Posts: 157

    Thanks smallaxe, now we are getting somewhere.:weightlifter:

    So the second part of my question, how is everyone treating for grubs.

    I do not want to be charging clients for extra applications, however two of the 3 with grub problems said "go for it". What I'd like to do is incorporate grub control into something I am already doing. Both of these places can forgo Pre-M so postponing Spring fertilizer and applying a Merit based would work. The second possibility is incorporating a insecticide for grubs with a broadleaf treatment.

    It's not going to be hard to figure out when the flying adults have become quite a pest over the last couple years.

    On the humorous side, I made a $100 last year trapping moles in the one ladies yard. She goes ballistic over them.:laugh:
     
  9. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,080

    On the property in FL,,, I've had great success in trapping moles, becuz they are the size of muskrats down there... We have little problem with them in our area here in Wisco, but when they do show up, I haven't helped the client get shed of them except for those "windmill sonar things"...

    How do you do it???
     
  10. Yatt

    Yatt LawnSite Member
    Posts: 157

    The best luck is with the Victor Out - O - Site moles traps. There is a knack to setting them and the way I set them is different from from the directions and videos on you tube.

    I found these and think they would be very good, not too expensive either.
    I think I am going to buy some. http://www.traplineproducts.com/
     

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