JR Peters 20-20-20 All Purpose Jack's Fertilizer

Discussion in 'Fertilizer Application' started by clayslandscape, Feb 23, 2013.

  1. clayslandscape

    clayslandscape LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 445

    I am looking for a cheaper alternative to The Plant Co. Fertilizer. I have a 200 gal Lesco skid.

    I have found that I could use a 5 lb tub of Jack's All Purpose Fertilizer and mix with 200 gals of water for about $20. I could feed several yards with 200 gals of mix.

    Have any of you ever used this? I have listed the link below.

    http://www.jrpeters.com/Products/Jack-s-Classic/All-Purpose.html
     
  2. Jaybrown

    Jaybrown LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,160

    Is that enough for even one yard ???
     
  3. clayslandscape

    clayslandscape LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 445

    It states one tablespoon per gallon.
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  4. RAlmaroad

    RAlmaroad LawnSite Silver Member
    from SC
    Posts: 2,162

    But you've got to determine how much that gallon will cover--It sure will not be 1000 sq. ft. Label should be able to tell you how much/acre or 1000sq. ft.
     
  5. ToddH

    ToddH LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,197

    5 pounds is only 1 pound of Nitrogen.
     
  6. countryclublawnllc

    countryclublawnllc LawnSite Member
    Posts: 151

    Why not just use sprayable urea? 46-0-0 which should go for for about $15-18 for a 50lb. Bag. If you want to put down .46N/1000sq. Ft. You need 1lb of that material/1000. If you spray 2gallons of water/1000 out of your sprayer 2 bags will cover 100,000 sqft with a full tank. Desired N rate per 1000 divided by N analysis gives you the amount of material per 1000. In this case it's .46/.46 which equals 1 lb of material for each 1000 sq ft sprayed.
     
  7. RAlmaroad

    RAlmaroad LawnSite Silver Member
    from SC
    Posts: 2,162



    Clay: Assuming that most lawns need at least 1/2lb of Nitrogen. Your mix of 5lbs of 20-20-20 has 1lb of Nitrogen, phosphate and potassium each. When mixing with 200 gals of water you would have enough to spray 2000 sq ft of lawn. You might want to reconsider multiple lawns. Methinks that 1 tablespoon/gal is for houseplants.
     
  8. agrostis

    agrostis LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,252

    I think your right, 1 tablespoon per gallon IS for houseplant's. Sprayable urea is the way to go.
     
  9. clayslandscape

    clayslandscape LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 445

    So if I were to mix 5lbs with 60 gals would be much more N
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  10. RAlmaroad

    RAlmaroad LawnSite Silver Member
    from SC
    Posts: 2,162

    Yes, to answer quickly. It is how much of the product (20-20-20) that you put into what ever amounts of water that you apply to 1000 sq. ft of lawn. IF you're wanting to give each 1000 sq. of lawn 1/2lb of Nitrogen; your 5lb mixed into 60 gallons of water would still cover 2000 sq ft of turf. You see your product is 20%-20%-20% meaning that .20X5 is 1.lb of Nitrogen, Phosphate and Potassium Or enough fertilize + carrier (water) to give 1/2lb/K. If you want to cover more turf then just up the amount of product (your fertilize) i.e. 10lb in 60 gallons of water would cover 4K putting down a combined mass of 15 gallons/K (60/4= 15). 20lb. of fertilize + 60 gallons of water would feed 8K of turf or putting down 7.5 gallons of fertilize and water combined= (60/8=7.5). To fill that 200 gallon tank to put down for instance 3 gallons of mix per 1000 sq.ft. then you would simply divide 200 by 3 or 66K of coverage with 66 X 2.5 (Your fertilize to cover 1K at 1/2lb) OR 165lb of your Peters fertilize. Of course you would have to recalculate in order get enough space, plus fertilize mass into that tank. Things are not complicated--Incidentally, few lawns would ever need that much Phosphate--some state even restrict the amount. Most soil retains phosphate and gives up it nitrogen and potassium easily.
    You may know this stuff already. If so, I apologize for the thesis and math lesson.
    If you need anything, just PM me.
    Roy
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2013

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