Kawisaki coils

Discussion in 'Mechanic and Repair' started by itteitj, Jun 4, 2008.

  1. itteitj

    itteitj LawnSite Member
    from RI
    Posts: 74

    This is the same issue I had with this engine last year. 19 HP kawi, 445 hrs, model FH601V keeps eating coils. My question is what is causing this. I have gone through 4 sets of coils. Last week while mowing after 1 hour, the engine starting skipping badly. It stalled a couple of times, restarted and then died. No spark. Help!!!:confused::confused::cry::dizzy:
     
  2. S DIAMOND

    S DIAMOND LawnSite Member
    from South
    Posts: 108

    Just out of curiosity, what plug are you running? Exact number and brand please.:)
     
  3. itteitj

    itteitj LawnSite Member
    from RI
    Posts: 74

    Plug info, NGK BPR4ES
     
  4. S DIAMOND

    S DIAMOND LawnSite Member
    from South
    Posts: 108

    I notice alot of people have experienced failures with Kawi coils. I do not work on very many Kawasaki units. Mostly Honda, Briggs, and Kohler. More Honda than the other.

    Briggs for example, serializes their coils (large units and some small) for one reason. If there is a consistent problem with them, they can track the numbered batch down, to see if it is a manufacturing problem or on the user end. I don't know if Kawasaki does the same, but I bet they have some system in place.

    It is rare to have consistent failures of this type (though not unheard of) in such a small span. It almost appears if this is a symptom of another problem related to your ignition system, possibly causing the coils to fail?

    When is the last time you changed out your plugs? Each time, or is this the same set for each new batch of coils?

    The reason I ask is, I have a Twin Kawi (22HP) on my personal rider, and recently I had experienced a similar problem with mine. Observing the plug, it appeared to have a descent color. However, the unit was running horribly especially when loaded. On occasion, it was just fine. The end result was in the plug.

    These plugs have resistors embedded in them. On newer ignition systems, there design is more than just noise suppression, but actually shunts the pulse that will damage sophisticated timing circuitry in certain 2 and 4 cycle engines. Long story long, after replacing the plugs, the problem stopped.

    It is my guess that the damaged resistor was reeking havoc on the ignition system giving the impression that there was some other problem. The truth is, it may have caused permanent damage in the long run if I had continued to use it. Again, that is just a guess reagarding this scenario.

    If you have'nt already, check to see if that is the correct temp range and type for your unit. I know I went a long way around to just say, check your plugs...:) Good luck...:walking:
     
  5. itteitj

    itteitj LawnSite Member
    from RI
    Posts: 74

    Thank you for your information. I will keep you posted. Right now It looks like I will change out the plugs and install new coils. I will also check the safety interlocks as well as the key switch. There is somthing under the flywheel that connects to the coils and the voltage regulator which I know little about.
     
  6. fixer67

    fixer67 LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,098

    Just food for thought. AYP mower like the ones from Sears short the charging system out put to ground on shut down. If you lose ground to the key switch at shut down the charging system out put get redirected to the kill lead of the coil and will fry the coil. I have seen this happen so many times I have lost count. You may have a similar switch set op or a bad key switch. If battery voltage or power of the charging system is allowed to get to the kill lead of the coil it will kill it for good. Briggs now puts backflow blocking diodes on some of there engines to help prevent this type of thing. Not sure if any of that helps you or not.
     
  7. S DIAMOND

    S DIAMOND LawnSite Member
    from South
    Posts: 108

    Good idea, check for loose or pinched, or wires chaffing. Perhaps it will be something simple. Keep us posted.

    That would be your stator.
    That supplies power to your mower while it's running and supplies the voltage necessary to charge your battery. Your voltage regulator is what converts the A/C current to a "usable" DC current for your mowers electronics (so to speak.) It also controls the amount of charge your battery sees.
     
  8. S DIAMOND

    S DIAMOND LawnSite Member
    from South
    Posts: 108

    Good point fixer 67. Looking at Kawasaki's ignition, it appears they too have a blocking diode intergrated for their coils also. hmmmm.
     
  9. fixer67

    fixer67 LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,098

    Where are the blocking diodes at? Briggs has them as part of the engine wiring harness. Maybe the Kawasaki's diodes are bad and letting unwanted voltage to pass.

    It may be a good idea to replace the engine wiring harness when you replace the coils. The engine wiring harness on most engines is only about a foot long so it is not trouble to change out
     
  10. itteitj

    itteitj LawnSite Member
    from RI
    Posts: 74

    Maybe it is not electrical. Yesterday I started taking the shroud off in order to remove coils. Just for the hell of it I sprayed starting fluid in the carb and it started. It ran poorly so I sprayed more in and it finally smoothed out. I ran it for awhile and it was fine. I am now thinking it may be fuel related or possible sticky valves. I put mystery oil in the crancase and some other stuff in the gas. Maybe the fuel pump is bad, I just don't know. I orderered a bunch of parts for the electrical and will still replace them but I am not sure at this point what is wrong with it.:confused::confused::confused:
     

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