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Keeping it clean

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by Barkleymut, Feb 22, 2001.

  1. Barkleymut

    Barkleymut LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,117

    Does anyone have any suggestions about washing equipment? It seems that a power washer may be the way to go. My only question is isn't it too powerful to be spraying near the wires and engine? It seems it may do some damage. I could go to a car wash with those pressure hoses but it seems they have less power. Just wanting some advice.
  2. dfor

    dfor LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 821

    A dealer powerwashed one of my mowers once and got water into the transmission. The mower looked great but the tranny ended up getting stuck in 5th gear. I know some guys will disagree, but too much pressure for my liking.
  3. kutnkru

    kutnkru LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,662

    I agree with "D". I would advise against using the pressure washer near the engines. What we do to avoid this is to put on an engine cover. Then we blast the heal out of the decks top and bottom to remove the debris. We wash our units at least every other day.

    You should also spray the mechanisms on the sides of your engines with WD-40 regularly to keep the motors running smoothly. Especially during those hot/dusty/dry summer days.

    Hope this helps.
  4. awm

    awm LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,354

    Snapper use to recommend rinsing grit and
    such off after mowing.I started that then.
    If you have a strong blower you could probably
    do as well. I do that most times.
  5. dmk395

    dmk395 LawnSite Senior Member
    from Ma
    Posts: 992

    Alot of times I will just use a wet rag and wipe the machine down, i figure thats the safest way. But sometimes I will spray it down with a hose, while leaving the machine running at a low rpm.
  6. John DiMartino

    John DiMartino LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,555

    I have been powerwashing my equipment for 11 yrs at the golf course and 3 yrs on my own.I havent had any problems,but I dont hit the engine hard and close,just fog it to quick,,and if im spraying around spindles and bearings,I grease them when im done cleaning it to drive out any water that gets in.If water got in youur gearbox-then you hve a vent thats aiming up,the guy cleaning it,deliberately cleaned arouind the seals to much.Ive never had that happen to me.I use between 1500-3200 psi,depending if im using the electric or gas washer.
  7. Ssouth

    Ssouth LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 437

    I use a cheap-o pressure washer. When doing around the engine or electrical I just back away a few feet. Only been doing this one season but have no problems so far. Also if I don't feel like hooking up the pres. washer I just use the "old fashion" water hose. It does just as good of a job on most of the machines but doesn't get the tires and deck as clean as I like them. By the way, never wash a machine right after it's been used. Let it cool down before apllying any water.
  8. GREG R

    GREG R LawnSite Member
    Posts: 105

    I use foaming tire cleaner.
    I use it everywhere, works great on
    the front of the decks when the grim is
    really stuck on, and makes the mower look
    new. spray it on and wait a few minute,and
    spray it off. sometimes you have to use a
    brush if the grim is really heavy
  9. Barkleymut

    Barkleymut LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,117

    Hey Greg, good idea with the tire cleaner. You also spray it on the engine? I guess it would work and should definetly save time. Thanks.
  10. kutnkru

    kutnkru LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,662

    We use that Mean Green degreaser and it has worked well for us.

    I suppose I might try the old armor all on the tires just to impress some of the ladies at a commercial account we have. Never thought about it really. Im sure it'll be great for a laff.


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