Lake Pump Removal

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by zman9119, Sep 17, 2013.

  1. zman9119

    zman9119 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 751

    So we had a fun job today. Little background on the system: 30+ year old system that we did not install. See my pictures in the "Hacks" thread for other pictures from this complex.

    Basically a 480v 3 phase pump that was causing the breaker to trip every time it kicked on. All testing showed that the pump motor and wiring were fine, but the well end on the pump was bad. Only problem was, no one knew where the damn pump was (except it was in the lake which is about 28 acres, 100' deep with steep sloped sides (old stone quarry)).

    Discharge pipe was visible from the breakwall, down 6' feet under water, which was 8' from the shore (lake has risen over the last 30 years to cover the breakwall and create a new shore line) so we had to use road plates to create some type of bridge between the shore and the breakwall.

    Our job was to find and remove the pump no matter what, and that is what we did. We knew that all the previous piping was going to be not used so we went ahead and removed that too.

    Pictures from the fun below...



    [​IMG]
    Some of our equipment for the day


    [​IMG]
    Moving road plates into place


    [​IMG]
    Our work area for the day (exposed due to previous research).
    You can see the breakwall out in the water, which was the reason for the road plates for support.


    [​IMG]
    Starting to get set-up


    [​IMG]
    Starting to get set-up


    [​IMG]
    Clearing our way to the pump


    [​IMG]
    Excavator sitting on the road plate pads onto the breakwall


    [​IMG]
    Slowly moving out onto the "bridge"


    [​IMG]
    Hoping we will not sink a 20,000 lbs excavator


    [​IMG]
    Discharge pipe sling


    [​IMG]
    Pump halfway back to shore


    [​IMG]
    Trying to pull the pump and discharge to us


    [​IMG]
    Pump on the breakwall


    [​IMG]
    The view while waiting for the crew to take the rigging off the pump


    [​IMG]
    Pump disconnected from discharge pipe and being moved to shore from the breakwall


    [​IMG]
    The pump and motor


    [​IMG]
    Intake screen


    [​IMG]
    View of the power feed cables that were going to the pump and if you look close the former discharge pipe


    [​IMG]
    Connecting to the drop pipe to remove it from the lake


    [​IMG]
    Backing away from the lake


    [​IMG]
    Excavator safely back on shore. Crew wondering around thinking about a swim.


    [​IMG]
    Cleaning up... removing road plates.


    [​IMG]
    Crew cleaning up


    [​IMG]
    Truck and excavator picture of course


    [​IMG]
    Pump and motor in the truck for a trip home
     
  2. CAPT Stream Rotar

    CAPT Stream Rotar LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,895

    awsome pics!

    Its time for the scrap yard/trash bin for that bad boy!
    Water looks dirty.
    Will you be installing a new pump?
     
  3. zman9119

    zman9119 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 751

    The water quality is extremely poor on all of the lakes at this complex we pull from. This one is probably one of the cleaner of all of them do due depth and volume we have.

    New pumps stations (multiple different types too) have been designed for all these sites since we have 3 pumps down right now. It is just a matter of them (PM) figuring out how much they want to spend. Either do it half-assed or do it correctly...
     
  4. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 46,979

    How are the new intakes going to be configured?
     
  5. zman9119

    zman9119 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 751

    We have speced out a few different options pump-wise so it really depends on the set-up the PM wants to go with (obviously we have our first choice that we hope they go for but who knows with them).

    One option is a standard self-flushing intake strainer if we go with the centrifugal pump or wet well option. Centrifugal would be a 4" suction and the wet well would be a 12" flume with Sure-Flo units on them. Obviously that increases the demand \ motor size of the pump station in general but the 4" only needs 15 gpm and the 12" 77 gpm.

    If we use a in lake skid unit, they have the self-cleaners built into them like the Sure-Flo but custom made.

    Silt is a huge issue on all the ponds \ lakes at this complex so filtration is key to keeping the units in decent shape
     

Share This Page