Land survey website

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by GElawn, Dec 18, 2007.

  1. GElawn

    GElawn LawnSite Member
    Posts: 11

    I'm looking for a good land survey to find square footage, to provide an estimate for some properties next spring. Can anyone help?
     
  2. pls8xx

    pls8xx LawnSite Member
    Posts: 64

    Can I assume the estimates are for mowing? Are they for tracts half acre and up? Can you use a calculator to add, subtract, multiply, and divide?

    If the above is true and your time is not worth more than a $100 an hour then I suggest you do the calcs yourself. A surveyor will probably want a minimum of $50 a pop. Even just starting out you should be able to do 2 an hour.

    If you like, pick a sample property near you and I'll walk you though the process.
     
  3. The Captain

    The Captain LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 607

    Another option is to contact your local tax assessor. They calc areas for the taxes. (They are not the most accurate numbers though.) The county recorder's office has plats of each lot for viewing. You can get the actual surveyed, gross lot areas from them.

    Best way is to get a feel for your production rates, look at the site and go with your instincts. As far as a surveyor doing the calcs. Forget it. They won't punch a button for less than $250.00
     
  4. SOUTHERNGREENSCAPES

    SOUTHERNGREENSCAPES LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 763

    get off your arse and go visit the customer, see why they are changing what they are doing and measure the yard. If you are just putting something together and the customer has not asked you for a quote, you can eyeball it by looking at it. That is if you know what you are doing.
     
  5. GElawn

    GElawn LawnSite Member
    Posts: 11

    Thanks for the reply, I was just wondering if there was a better or more accurate way to measure square footage, other than with my wheel. After all it is winter here in Michigan.

    Some area company CEO's had lunch and my name came up, they called me and asked for an estimate. I looked at there property, now filled with snow, and gave a ruff estimate. Once spring comes I can give them a much more accurate price. Unless there is a web site I can goto and see there property.?????
     
  6. BrandonV

    BrandonV LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,260

    i use GIS sites (varies by county) here all the time, in some cases it's just like having a plot
     
  7. GreenT

    GreenT LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 43,014

    Google Earth has pretty good measuring tools for rough estimating however, if the property is located in an area with a not-so-well defined photography it won't help you.

    I use it all the time before I go out to give estimates.
     
  8. AGLA

    AGLA LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,749

    one of the problems with using google earth or other aerial photos is that they are usually shot in early spring before trees leaf out so that structures are not obscured by canopy. That also means that nothing else is greened up, so it can be hard to interpret what is lawn and what is not.
     
  9. John Zaprala

    John Zaprala LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 283

    This isn't rocket science. Why do you need to be more precise for lawn services? Maybe you'd be better off accounting for a margin or error. I use reference points and draw it out on CAD to get exact SQFT for patios and such, but still account for a margin or error.
     
  10. AGLA

    AGLA LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,749

    Nothing is going to be better than measuring it on site. It gives you a chance to see the conditions directly.

    There are lots of ways to measure quickly and accurately even when dealing with odd shaped areas. One of the easiest is the average width method. You measure the full length of an area and then lay a tape 90 degees to that and figure about where the average width is while using the first tape as a guide. Then you simply use length times width.

    Any aerial photo is taken from an angle and is distorted. They make a nice reference, but measuring from one is not the best thing both because of distortion and misinterpretation.
     

Share This Page