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Landscape software

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by Paradise Landscapes, Mar 19, 2006.

  1. Paradise Landscapes

    Paradise Landscapes LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 960

  2. Adamma Landscape Group

    Adamma Landscape Group LawnSite Member
    Posts: 88

    YPYG. To me what you pay is what you get in software. The best softwares are usually the most expensive. Remember it took a lot of time for scientists and engineers to write and develop the software. Cheap softwares never work well. Save money and buy the top of the line software and you will never regret. :usflag:
     
  3. Xterminator

    Xterminator LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 279

    I just got ideaspectrum Realtime Landscaping Pro put it in this morning played with it a little. I think I'll like it once I get used to it
     
  4. Paradise Landscapes

    Paradise Landscapes LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 960

    YPYG? anyways, what program do you use?
     
  5. Travel'n Trees

    Travel'n Trees LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 631

    Had punch it's at BEST BUY. I have not missed a job with landscape pro .
     
  6. Paradise Landscapes

    Paradise Landscapes LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 960

    I know alot of the members here swears by Landscape Pro. I do too, but, although it is arround 1500.00, I am looking for a program that I can start with. The jobs I get can't justify Landscape Pro at this current time. I do plan on buying Landscape Pro when I get more Design/Build jobs.
     
  7. Dreams To Designs

    Dreams To Designs LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,406

    Paradise, are you a landscape designer or a landscaper. It matters because of the amount of time, effort and skill you will apply to any landscape design you create, whether it be hand drawn, 3D imaging or CAD based. If the jobs you are doing now don't justify Pro Landscape, perhaps you would be better served by graph paper or vellum and pencils. If you believe Pro Landscape or any other software is going to make your designs better, you are mistaken. You may be able to present better, with 3D imaging, or the CAD drawings may be clearer because they are drawn by a computer, but you will still be the designer. Many landscapers I deal with tried to do their own design work and found it to be another division for their company they could not afford, in both time and cost. Some prefer to design on the fly, right on site and make it up as they go along. That's is ok, but you won't typically get the high end jobs. If you want designs that are as good as your own work, perhaps you should network with some folks that can help you in that area, just as you might sub out to a hardscaper or irrigation installer. If you are set on doing design, and you have the skills, talent and time, Pro Landscape is an excellent program and I have been very successful using it.

    As a designer, I do work ranging from simple 3D images to full blown plans with construction notes, imaging, plant and materials lists, incorporating engineers and any other design services need by the clients or installers I am working with. The programs that are sold at retail outlets belong in the hands of homeowners that want to try and design their own landscapes, or play around and share their ideas with you. We all have to start somewhere, and sometimes buying a less expensive tool looks like a means to an end, but often times it will only add frustration to your quest for professionalism. There are many independent designers and even some internet design companies that may be able to assist you. My suggestion is, do what you do best and can be profitable at, and when in doubt, sub it out. No matter what that service may be. Most of the installers I work with do not say no to their clients, they just find a sub that can do it for them, including design work.

    Kirk
     
  8. Paradise Landscapes

    Paradise Landscapes LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 960

    I do all, Landscape, hardscape and designs. You are right though. I mainly use the hand method right now. That works well for now. It's just that I thought a computer program would help me visualize what I'm trying to offer to the customer. By hand, I'm doing top views, a program would give me frontal views. I'm trying to do all. The soon-to-be wife of mine wants to do design work and wants to go to college for it this fall. Meantime, I'm the designer, Landscaper and Hardscaper.
     
  9. Dreams To Designs

    Dreams To Designs LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,406

    3D imaging is a cool feature, but it is merely a presentation tool to allow your client to get a vision of what you are trying to get across to them. It is not very accurate or real, but it does offer a glimpse of virtual reality. It is a great tool for most homeowners, as they don't understand a well designed landscape plan until it is installed. A nice feature of the 3D imaging is you can create a photo and email it to the client to get feedback without visiting or waiting for you next meeting. The pics are pretty self explanatory and they will like it or not. Sometimes you may use an image of a plant that looks better than the image of the plant you intend on using. it's only a suggested image and your horticultural knowledge will enable you to choose the right material. The imaging does take some time to master, but is worth the effort for a generation that must see it to understand. You may even find they raise the budget to meet the concept you have created for them With pro Landscape you are able to create lighting scheme for the landscape you propose and I always include that as part of my design work. Lighting is another excellent income source and your clients should appreciate lighting as it relates to safety, security and aesthetics.

    Kirk
     
  10. NickN

    NickN LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Alabama
    Posts: 1,010

    <i>3D imaging is a cool feature, but it is merely a presentation tool to allow your client to get a vision of what you are trying to get across to them. It is not very accurate or real, but it does offer a glimpse of virtual reality. It is a great tool for most homeowners, as they don't understand a well designed landscape plan until it is installed.</i>
    <p>Exactly right.It's a great closing tool.I've increased my closes to around 80% using ............drumroll...........Punch Master Landscape.A cheap program,but it gets the point across.The more you experiment with it,the better you get.If you can't get the more expensive programs,get Punch and give it a try.PM if you have any questions,as it's a bit difficult to figure out getting the home laid out.You'll need a graphics program as well,like Photoshop or Paint Shop Pro to edit the home photo.
    One nice feature I've found useful is the 2D grid layout.You can set your squares to size(like graph paper) and drop in your plants.When you're done,you know how many plants you'll need without having to hand draw it.
    The virtual ruler is nice as well.You can expand it to the length needed,and use it as a guide for your bed design,instead of counting squares.
    Right now I'm booked into May with the help of cheap software.Once someone can "see" what you've got in mind,it makes closing a whole lot easier.
     

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