Large owner salary

Discussion in 'Business Operations' started by dmk395, Nov 2, 2002.

  1. Mow&Snow

    Mow&Snow LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 335

    HOW CAN YOU HAVE THANKSGIVING WITHOUT THE COLD?

    That is just not American....
     
  2. John Allin

    John Allin LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,489

    Bill will love this..... 10" new snow this morning (Thanksgiving), with another 3-4" due tonight..... and another foot predicted for Saturday into Sunday.....
     
  3. Mow&Snow

    Mow&Snow LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 335

    John, lucky u. Try not to rub it in tho ok?
     
  4. bubble boy

    bubble boy LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,020

    sorry that i'm off topic, is your thanksgiving always the last thursday in November? or is it the 29 November?

    the question came up last night

    actually i'll get somewhat back on topic.

    john just curious what was the last season you manned a plow truck? i assume you don't now unless you like punishment:D

    i actually enjoy plowing, but i was curious for those owners with operations on the larger side. do you just co-ordinate? do you drive an "extra"truck just helping at larger sites? do you lie in bed and giggle away while looking out the window?
     
  5. John Allin

    John Allin LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,489

    I sure would like to be out there every night pushing snow, but it becomes a matter of where am I the most effective. It used to be that I affected the bottom line the most by being out there "producing" as I was much more productive than anyone working for us.... of course, I was more motivated too given my position with the company (as most "owners" are I suspect). Increasing production (in our organization) increased profits.

    However, as we grew my affect on the bottom line (by being out in the storm) grew less and less (percentage wise). And, it got to the point where I could have more affect by staying in the office and assisting in coordinating billing. By making sure nothing got inadvertantly forgotten in the billing cycle, and by forcing the invoicing to be done timely, and by interpreting data that came in from the field (total snowfall, number of times on a site, etc) that affected the total billing dollars - my personal affect on the bottom line became more valuable being "inside" than "outside".

    At this point in time my affect is predicated on relationships with customers (mostly outside Erie), visiting our larger sites several times a year, interacting with potential customers throughout the year, and the like. However, my time is spent mostly with longer range planning, reviewing reports from the various areas of the business, and approving larger expenditures.
    It's a natural progression as the business grows.

    But.... that being said.... after 24 years of this, I've paid my dues being in a truck for days at a time and I'm well aware of how it goes. Of course, last year I wasn't in a plow truck at all as I was in SLC all winter.... and the first storm this season I was in the office. Thanksgiving morning I slept but plowed a bit during the day. I’m in the office today (Friday) handle coordinating all the invoicing from the past several days both in Erie and outside Erie.

    And, if anything goes wrong during the night that requires my attention - I'm a phone call away. I also call in once or twice during the night and ask "is everything ok?" - and if the answer is "yes", I hang up and go back to sleep. I do often ask if they need anything from me, and usually the answer is "no" and that is good too.

    However, just because I get to sleep more at than in the past, don't think the pressure to perform is lessened. It isn't. It's just that the scope of my view is much, much wider now (like 27 states wide).
     
  6. bubble boy

    bubble boy LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,020


    i can see where at a certain point for things to run smooth you have to not be plowing. that transition in winter has not occurred for me yet, nor will it soon i doubt. for summer work, seems to be coming soon. its a tough step to take, the step "back". i often use the phrase "if i'm on a lawn i can't make money". it's an exaggeration, but there is some truth.

    as for going back to sleep, i'll be thinking about you next time i'm pushing:D :D :D

    i do understand the pressure you feel is from the business, not necessarily the tasks performed. 27 states, geez you should get a big map and mark conquered, and next to conquer.

    my old quote was

    " and when alexander saw the breadth of his domain, he wept for there were no more worlds to conquer."

    soon enough i guess:eek:

    and by the way i've told all my friends about this "guy" that plowed the olympic games:p
     
  7. B. Phagan

    B. Phagan LawnSite Member
    Posts: 95

    I may have spoken too soon John...........it was 39 last night.......something about a well digger?? Way too cold for a 4th generation Floridian!!

    Snow???? Not familiar with that stuff.



    Hope all had a great Thanksgiving.......think I've gained about 20 lbs between the turkey, honey ham, pies, great gravy, taters, etc.
     
  8. dmk395

    dmk395 LawnSite Senior Member
    from Ma
    Posts: 992

    JAA,

    Realizing that you have been in business for 20 someodd years....how many years did it take you to essentially get out of the plowtruck.....meaning your main focus in business being manager not plow operator?
     
  9. John Allin

    John Allin LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,489

    I stopped having any assigned plowing accounts about 5 years ago..... meaning I could then concentrate on the businss part but just plow snow when I wanted to and when other duties were completed. Last season was my first full year having not plowed any snow at all.
     
  10. Mykster

    Mykster LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 668

    Like Utah??? I read the article of the snow removal project in Utah from another co. Then I saw the letter you wrote to that mag about who was the actual GC of the project. Was that one your biggest projects?
     

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